Art gallery – A Love 4 Art http://alove4art.com/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 00:00:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://alove4art.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/icon-2022-02-04T222405.121-150x150.jpg Art gallery – A Love 4 Art http://alove4art.com/ 32 32 First Nations Art Gallery moves permanently to Bendigo Visitor Center https://alove4art.com/first-nations-art-gallery-moves-permanently-to-bendigo-visitor-center/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 06:01:55 +0000 https://alove4art.com/first-nations-art-gallery-moves-permanently-to-bendigo-visitor-center/ A new First Nations Gallery called Djaa Djuwima will be established inside the Bendigo Visitor Centre. Key points: A new First Nations Art Gallery will be established in the Bendigo Visitor Center building at Pall Mall The gallery will be called Djaa Djuwima, which means “Show, Share Country” in Djaara Three curated exhibitions will take […]]]>

A new First Nations Gallery called Djaa Djuwima will be established inside the Bendigo Visitor Centre.

The gallery will host three exhibitions held each year and follows on from the successful Piinpi indigenous fashion exhibition hosted by Bendigo Art Gallery in 2020.

Aunty Lyn Warren is part of Wartaka, a creative advisory group set up to help develop Djaa Djuwima.

She said the name of the exhibition space meant showing and sharing the country of Djaara.

Aunty Lyn Warren hosts the First Nations Gallery.(ABC Central Victoria: Shannon Schubert)

“I’m pretty proud to be involved in this,” she said.

“With the story of Dja Dja Wurrung and the story of the culture and the land we are on…I think it goes very well together.

“It’s fantastic. It’s so central and it will be so good for our people.”

Discover the country and the culture

The gallery will open its doors on November 24, with the first exhibition organized around the theme of Gutangarr Dja Dja Wurrung Djayi, which means: “You are on [or in] Country Dja Dja Wurrung”.

Janet Bromley, First Nations Arts Officer, will curate the exhibit.

She said Djaa Djuwima took 10 years to make.

“When I arrived in Bendigo I was like, ‘Where is it?'” she said.

a picture of a room
There will be a cleaning of the building before it is transformed into a First Nations art space.(ABC Central Victoria: Shannon Schubert)

“It’s what people have been doing for 60,000 years…it’s in our DNA, it’s [art] is our way of communicating.”

She said local First Nations artists previously only had dedicated exhibition space once a year in Bendigo.

“I have hosted the Knuldoorong Art Show at Dudley House every NAIDOC week,” she said.

“We’ve gone from 15 dedicated artists to 30 or more and I’m finding more and more all the time.”

A photo of a woman in front of a poster
Janet Bromley, Yorta Yorta wife, made the emu print in the Djaa Djuwima logo.(ABC Central Victoria: Shannon Schubert)

Ms. Bromley is keen to see the community of artists grow in Djaa Djuwima.

“We have a lot of young people now. When we last showed, we had two high school kids,” she said.

“For First Nations people to see their peers here in the community, in this space, I think that will be a big thing.”

Djaa Djuwima is expected to feature painting, weaving, tailoring, carpentry and artifacts.

an exterior photo of a building
The Bendigo Visitor Center Post Office Gallery will be transformed into Djaa Djuwima, the Bendigo First Nations Gallery.(ABC Central Victoria: Shannon Schubert)

Running from success

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Ucross to Reopen Art Gallery with Alumni Show – Sheridan Media https://alove4art.com/ucross-to-reopen-art-gallery-with-alumni-show-sheridan-media/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 16:12:32 +0000 https://alove4art.com/ucross-to-reopen-art-gallery-with-alumni-show-sheridan-media/ The public is invited to a reception on Friday, November 4, beginning at 6 p.m., at the newly renovated Ucross Art Gallery. There will be an exhibition, ‘Time, Mark, Memory: Ucross at 40‘ which features the work of 15 visual artists, maximizing the use of the new space. Tickets are free and open to the […]]]>

The public is invited to a reception on Friday, November 4, beginning at 6 p.m., at the newly renovated Ucross Art Gallery. There will be an exhibition, ‘Time, Mark, Memory: Ucross at 40‘ which features the work of 15 visual artists, maximizing the use of the new space. Tickets are free and open to the public via Eventbrite.

The gallery, which was closed for 12 months to undergo a major renovation as part of the non-profit organization 40e Anniversary Campaign, extends Ucross’ mission in its community by providing exhibitions, events and educational arts activities to the public.

The newly renovated interior of the Ucross Art Gallery features a two-story central hall, allowing for large-scale works of art, such as sculptures and installations. Additionally, the gallery offers expanded wall space, a digital media room, reception and art storage space, a collaborative meeting room, and improved lighting and technology, as well as significantly improved accessibility.

“We’re excited to show the community what we’re working on,” said Ucross President William Belcher. “The gallery’s renovation and updated design make for great group shows like”Time, Brand, Memory: Ucross at 40′ possible, and Leah Ollman has done a wonderful job of developing a show that fits the new space.

Ucross President William Belcher

The exhibition: curated by Ucross Fellow and arts writer Leah Ollman, “Time, mark, memoryfeatures the work of 15 contemporary visual artists from Ucross’ impressive roster of visual arts alumni.

Ollman is an accomplished arts journalist, essayist and critic. She has written about art for the Los Angeles Times since 1987 and has been a corresponding editor for Art in America since 1997. Her articles and reviews have also appeared in publications such as The Brooklyn Rail, Sculpture, Paris Review Daily, Photograph, Art in Print, History of Photography and ARTnews, among others. She started working as a guest curator for “Time, Mark, Memory” at the end of 2021.

“Time has become the guiding principle of this exhibition not only because the exhibition is celebrating an anniversary – the 40e year of the Ucross residency program – but because a residency is, essentially, a gift of time,” Ollman said. “I wanted to examine how ‘residence time’ differs from ordinary time and consider more broadly how time is experienced, physically, intellectually and emotionally. »

Former Ucross artists selected for “Time, Mark, Memory” include recipients of many prestigious awards and honors in the field, including Pollock-Krasner Foundation Fellowships, United States Artist Fellowships, Creative Capital Awards, the Herb Albert Award in the Arts, Guggenheim Fellowships and others.

Exhibiting artists include Michael Berman of Silver City, New Mexico; Arminée Chahbazian of Calistoga, California; Jennifer Garza-Cuen of Corpus Christi, Texas; Munson Hunt of Santa Fe, New Mexico; Shanti Grumbine of New Paltz, New York; Sharon Harper of Cambridge, Massachusetts; Lisa Hochstein of Santa Cruz, California; Elizabeth Hohimer of Marfa, Texas; Bill Morrison of New York, New York; Jenene Nagy of Riverside, California; Sarah McKenzie of Boulder, Colorado; Stephen Vitiello of Richmond, Virginia; Sarah Walker of New York, New York; Anne Wilson of Chicago, Illinois; and Katarina Wong from Santa Fe, New Mexico, New York, New York and Havana, Cuba.

The new gallery allowed Ollman to fill the space with a variety of media and forms, including photography, sculpture, audio installation, video, and mixed media. Works range from Hohimer’s “Laying Halfway in the Shade” in earth-dyed cotton to Morrison’s short “LIGHT IS CALLING” to Hunt’s “Torso,” a 150-pound sculpture in charred walnut.

“Whatever their medium, be it fiber or film, paint, pencil or photography, the 15 artists in the exhibition address the complexity of time and make its elusive nature materially compelling,” Ollman said. “My own Ucross residency nearly ten years ago was a tremendously formative and nurturing experience. Organizing this exhibition was an honor for me and a way of paying tribute both to the generous enterprise that is Ucross and to the of 1,000 former visual arts students of the residency program.

Time, mark, memorywill run from November 4 through January 20, and the exhibit is sponsored by the Wyoming Arts Council, with support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Wyoming Legislature, and Arete Design Group.

Current art gallery and artist concepts of what it will look like after renovations

The gallery: Upon reopening, the Ucross Art Gallery will host three exhibitions per year, each featuring works by former contemporary artists, including an exhibition focusing on recipients of the Ucross Fellowship for Native American Visual Artists.

“Time, Mark, Memory: Ucross at 40” is the first in a series of three alumni exhibits that together are designed to celebrate 40 years of Ucrosse anniversary as a residency program. Since 1983, Ucross has provided visual and interdisciplinary artists, writers, composers and choreographers with uninterrupted time, studio space, accommodations and the experience of the majestic High Plains on its 20,000-acre cattle ranch.

Stream running through the lands of Ucross

“The Ucross Art Gallery is tied to our mission and our investment in community engagement,” Belcher said. “This will allow us to champion artists beyond their residency and provide relevant and meaningful arts programming for visitors of all ages.”

The renovation of the gallery is a key element of the 40e Anniversary campaign. Ucross has been working with Arete Design Group, a Sheridan-based architectural firm, and O’Dell Construction as the contractor, on the project since October 2021.

The Ucross Art Gallery is located at 30 Big Red Lane in Ucross, Wyoming. Starting November 4, the gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., or by appointment.

Learn more about upross.org.

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Ucross Art Gallery Launches Volunteer Program | Local News https://alove4art.com/ucross-art-gallery-launches-volunteer-program-local-news/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://alove4art.com/ucross-art-gallery-launches-volunteer-program-local-news/ UCROSS — Ucross will launch a new volunteer program in support of the Ucross Art Gallery, which will reopen this fall after a major renovation. The non-profit arts organization is looking for volunteers interested in local history, contemporary art and community engagement. No prior experience is necessary. “This is an exciting opportunity to participate in […]]]>

UCROSS — Ucross will launch a new volunteer program in support of the Ucross Art Gallery, which will reopen this fall after a major renovation. The non-profit arts organization is looking for volunteers interested in local history, contemporary art and community engagement. No prior experience is necessary.

“This is an exciting opportunity to participate in Ucross’s vision for the future and its connection to the local community,” said Caitlin Addlesperger, Ucross Communications and Special Events Manager. “We are looking for people who are passionate about the role the arts play in the region, as well as people interested in Ucross’s mission, artists and programming.”

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Local Artist to Give Fall Classes at Spruce Grove Art Gallery https://alove4art.com/local-artist-to-give-fall-classes-at-spruce-grove-art-gallery/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 18:43:13 +0000 https://alove4art.com/local-artist-to-give-fall-classes-at-spruce-grove-art-gallery/ Breadcrumb Links New Local News Parkland County artist Lisa Matthias will lead four classes for the Allied Arts Council at the Spruce Grove Art Gallery this fall. File photo. Photo by Getty Images Content of the article Now is the time to embark on an artistic project. Advertisement 2 This ad has not loaded yet, […]]]>

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This fall, Parkland County artist Lisa Matthias will teach three classes for the Allied Arts Council at the Spruce Grove Art Gallery.

“Setting aside a few hours to do something creative is really something special. For a lot of people it’s just about being in the moment,” Matthias said.

The first asks the students to make an acrylic painting of an autumn landscape based on one of the four photographs taken by Matthias. The course will take place over two evening sessions and explore acrylic painting, color theory, mixing, brushwork, and more. No experience is necessary and all supplies are included.

This course is for students 16 years and older and costs $75. It will take place on October 20 and 27 (both Thursdays) from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

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The second class will teach students the basics of watercolor painting. Students will learn a wide variety of watercolor techniques, including stretching paper, color theory, achieving value and contrast, and composition. Students will complete one painting per class using still life, landscape and more as subject matter. No experience is necessary and a list of supplies will be provided for students to purchase on their own.

This course is for students 16 years and older and costs $110. It will take place every Thursday from Nov. 3 to Nov. 24, from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

The third lesson will familiarize students with the basics of drawing and sketching. They develop and improve their drawing skills through a series of exercises and projects that build on each other each week. Students will learn to observe with precision, understand proportion, create depth and volume through value, create interesting compositions, and learn linear perspective. They will draw still lifes, landscapes, portraits and more using pencil, ink, charcoal and a variety of other drawing media. No experience is necessary and all supplies are included.

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This course is for students ages 12-19 and costs $85. It will take place every Monday from November 7 to November 28.

“I know a lot of people want to improve their drawing skills, so I try to fill some niches in the community,” Matthias said.

Primarily an engraver, Matthias will also be hosting two brand new one-design engraving workshops in December where students can print their own holiday-themed cards. The specific details of these workshops are still in preparation.

It’s a type of print Matthias has been experimenting with in her home studio in preparation for her upcoming exhibition at the Spruce Grove Art Gallery in January 2023. Unlike her usual woodcuts, she said monotype prints offer more support expressive resulting in a more unique end product.

“It’s going to be an intimate exhibition where I’ll show some of my smaller, more experimental works with the community,” Matthias said.

To learn more about other art classes offered at Spruce Grove this fall, visit alliedartscouncil.com.

“There is such a variety of people taking these courses. I want everyone to enjoy their time and come away with a lot of skills and information that they may not have had before,” Matthias said.

rhowell@postmedia.com

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our first look at the art gallery of NSW’s new Sydney Modern https://alove4art.com/our-first-look-at-the-art-gallery-of-nsws-new-sydney-modern/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 20:03:28 +0000 https://alove4art.com/our-first-look-at-the-art-gallery-of-nsws-new-sydney-modern/ In 1972, when the Art Gallery of New South Wales opened its first modern building, it was rightly praised for its innovative design. Architect Andrew Anderson incorporated the latest aspects of museum architecture. The egg crate ceilings have been designed to reduce noise from people walking on its marble floors. There were movable screens that […]]]>

In 1972, when the Art Gallery of New South Wales opened its first modern building, it was rightly praised for its innovative design.

Architect Andrew Anderson incorporated the latest aspects of museum architecture. The egg crate ceilings have been designed to reduce noise from people walking on its marble floors. There were movable screens that looked like walls and adjustable light levels for fragile art.

But where the building faced Sydney Harbour, Andersons placed a giant window. The intrusion of reality into the art connected visitors to the outside world.

It was revolutionary for its time, a marked contrast to the giant granite box of the National Gallery of Victoriaopening in 1968. The Melbourne building had followed the standard museum design pattern of eliminating windows to maximize overhead space.

Just over 50 years later, the expansion of Sydney Modern under the direction of an architectural firm SANAA could be described as putting Andersons’ approach on steroids. It will open in December, but in recent weeks small groups of visitors have received preview tours, while installation crews put the finishing touches on.



Read more: State Library Victoria proves libraries aren’t just about books: they’re about community


A native art gallery

The relationship between the Sydney Modern and the old building echoes Andersons’ uncompromising yet sympathetic connection to his built in 1972 to the original Grand Courts designed by Walter Liberty Vernon.

The new link between the two buildings includes an installation honoring the country’s history by artist Wiradjuri and Kamilaroi Jonathan Jones.

This new building is very aware of its physical and spiritual situation. It is dominated by light from its slender glass walls. The ground floor entrance gives the impression of entering a crystal.

As a nod to Andersons glorious first showcase, the Yiribana Indigenous Art Gallery has a window overlooking the harbor so visitors can see where the Gadigal ancestors first witnessed the arrival of the condemned in 1788.

Yiribana’s move from the basement of the old building is a physical manifestation of the significant change in Australia’s understanding of its culture.

Yiribana Gallery installation view with (left to right) Ronnie Tjampitjinpa ‘Tingari fire dreaming at Wilkinkarra’ 2008, Willy Tjungurrayi ‘Tingari story’ 1986, Yhonnie Scarce ‘Death zephyr’ 2017 (top), Rusty Peters ‘Waterbrain ‘ 2002 and Vernon Ah Kee ‘Unwritten #9’ 2008.
Photo © Art Gallery of New South Wales, Jenni Carter

In 1958, the gallery’s deputy director, Tony Tuckson, facilitated the collector and surgeon Stuart ScougallTiwi Pukumani funeral post gift. For the first time, indigenous work was presented as art and not as an anthropological artifact.

In 1972, there was a temporary exhibition of Yirrkala bark paintings and figures, but it was soon replaced by another temporary exhibition.

In late 1973, funding from the arts programs associated with the opening of the Sydney Opera House enabled a permanent installation of Melanesian art, another gift from Scougall. It was accompanied by what the trustees thought was a temporary display of Aboriginal art.

Tuckson died during the installation of the exhibit, and she remained on view, in a small, dark space at the bottom of the gallery’s marble stairs, until around 1980.

In 1983 Djon Mundine organized a temporary exhibition of bark paintings and the following year was appointed part-time curator, but there was little formal interest in Aboriginal art from the gallery.

The big change came in 1991 when Hetti Perkins curated another temporary exhibition, this time of hitherto little-known Indigenous women artists.

Perkins’ achievement was particularly appreciated by Mollie Gowingone of the volunteer guides.

Beginning in 1992, Gowing collaborated with Perkins to privately fund the gallery’s main collection of contemporary Aboriginal art.

In 1994, at the initiative of New South Wales Minister for the Arts, Peter Collins, the gallery opened Yiribana, its first permanent exhibition space dedicated to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art.

This basement was previously the offices and work area of ​​the Public Programs Department and was not a particularly art-friendly space. It took well over a decade before Indigenous art began to be incorporated into other Australian art exhibits.

Yiribana Gallery installation view with (left) Ned Grant, Fred Grant, Patju Presley, Lawrence Pennington and Simon Hogan ‘Wati Kutjara’ 2019 and (right) Richard Bell, Emory Douglas ‘We can be heroes’ 2014.
Photo © Art Gallery of New South Wales, Jenni Carter

Yiribana’s move to Sydney Modern can be seen as the gallery’s affirmation of the importance of Indigenous cultures to any understanding of what Australia can be.

Cultural exchange

In 1972, when the newly opened gallery wanted to show its best art to the world, the main gallery was dominated by art from the United States. All eyes were drawn to Morris Louis Ayin.

This same space now has the work of Sol LeWitt in visual conversation with Emily Kame Kngwarreye and Gloria Tamerre Petyarre.

Sol LeWitt ‘Wall drawing #955, Loopy Doopy (red and purple)’ 2000 in the John Kaldor Family Hall at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, first drawn by Paolo Arao, Nicole Awai, Hidemi Nomura, Jean Shin, Frankie Woodruff at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, November 2000; current installation designed by Kit Bylett, Andrew Colbert, Troy Donaghy, Szymon Dorabialski, Gabriel Hurier, Rachel Levine, Owen Lewis, Nadia Odlum, Tim Silver, Alexis Wildman at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, August 2022.
© Estate of Sol LeWitt

The integration of Australian art with the art of the rest of the world is a reflection of a historical reality. The last century was a time of mass travel and cultural exchange, when many national barriers were crossed, especially in the arts.

The Sydney Modern, combined with the reconfiguration of 20th century exhibits in the old building, is a silent repudiation of that cultural grimace that persists in seeing Australian culture as a kind of backwater.

Although most of Sydney Modern is filled with light, its most surprising space is shrouded in darkness.

During World War II, when the navy fleet had to refuel at Garden Island, the Australian government secretly built a giant underground fuel storage tank, its true depth hidden below the waterline.

Now a spiral staircase leads the visitor to the Reservoir, a magical space of oil-stained columns and echoing sounds. At the moment it is empty, but in a few weeks the Argentine-Peruvian artist, Adrian Villar Rojas will begin creating a new work, The End of Imagination.

The Tank space in the new Art Gallery of New South Wales building.
Photo © Art Gallery of New South Wales, Jenni Carter

There are two meanings to the title. One suggests that the imagination is now dead. However, by being placed at the heart of such an inspiring space, it seems that Rojas suggests a culmination of the imagination, a questioning of what an imagination can be in these times of Anthropocene.

The work is not done yet. As with the rest of the art that will fill this magical space, we’ll have to wait and see.



Read more: Cities are made of more than buildings and roads. They are also created by moods – how a city makes you feel


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Kaplan Art Gallery revival kicks off with new exhibition – Essex News Daily https://alove4art.com/kaplan-art-gallery-revival-kicks-off-with-new-exhibition-essex-news-daily/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 22:12:35 +0000 https://alove4art.com/kaplan-art-gallery-revival-kicks-off-with-new-exhibition-essex-news-daily/ Photo courtesy of Bloomfield CollegeAbove is “Firebird,” a work by collage artist and book illustrator Bryan Collier. BLOOMFIELD, NJ – Bloomfield College has announced the resumption of art exhibits at its Scott A. Kaplan Art Gallery located on the second floor of the college library at 80-86 Oakland Ave. in Bloomfield. After a brief period […]]]>
Photo courtesy of Bloomfield College
Above is “Firebird,” a work by collage artist and book illustrator Bryan Collier.

BLOOMFIELD, NJ – Bloomfield College has announced the resumption of art exhibits at its Scott A. Kaplan Art Gallery located on the second floor of the college library at 80-86 Oakland Ave. in Bloomfield.

After a brief period of inactivity, the revived gallery will kick off with a reception for the solo exhibition of acclaimed collage and illustration artist Bryan Collier on Friday, October 7, from 6-8 p.m. All exhibits are free and open to the public. Those interested in attending the reception should RSVP by Friday, September 30 to GalleryDirector@Bloomfield.edu.

Born in Pocomoke, Maryland, Collier’s interest in art began early, inspired by Ezra Jack Keats’ “The Snow Day” and Crockett Johnson’s “Harold and the Purple Crayon”. He began to develop a unique style of painting that incorporated both watercolors and collages. His art has been exhibited at the Capitol in Washington, DC, and he received a fellowship from the Pratt Institute in New York, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree with honors.

“Collage is more than just an art style. Collage consists of bringing together different elements. Once you gain sensitivity about connection, how different things relate to each other, you deepen your understanding of yourself and others,” said Collier, who now spends her time working on book illustrations, creating artwork and talking with teachers, librarians. and students on books and art.

Kaplan Art Gallery’s new director, Wanda Croudy, is an experienced art curator who has served as an adjunct professor at Bloomfield College since 2008. She is a board member of Art in the Atrium and a member and past chair of the African-American Cultural Committee of the Montclair Art Museum. Croudy is also the host of the “It Begins With Passion” live events on Instagram, which feature gallery and studio tours led by artists and designers. She was also the coordinator of the Visual Art Center of New Jersey’s annual juried art exhibition and she was the publicist for the Chrysler Museum of Art in Norfolk, Virginia.

“I am thrilled to relaunch the Kaplan Art Space and to be able to create inviting and changing exhibitions that will bring new and returning visitors to the gallery to view the art of various artists as well as the artworks of talented students at our college,” Croudy said. . “Meeting the artists after each exhibition opening will be a feature of the gallery events we have planned.”

“The Kaplan Gallery is an ideal place to showcase the work of our exceptional students and to bring professional artists into the university community. We are thrilled to offer a robust schedule of culturally relevant and timely programs in the gallery and invite all college friends to join us,” said Michael A. Palladino, Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean of Faculty.

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Naila Art Gallery’s ‘Saudi Crafts’ exhibition reflects a changing nation https://alove4art.com/naila-art-gallerys-saudi-crafts-exhibition-reflects-a-changing-nation/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 20:01:23 +0000 https://alove4art.com/naila-art-gallerys-saudi-crafts-exhibition-reflects-a-changing-nation/ JEDDAH/RIYADH: As the sun set on Friday evening, people gathered at Jeddah Art Promenade to enjoy the Saudi National Day celebrations. The nation’s dark green and white flag was seen everywhere and many children wore matching clothes. Some women wore crystals on their faces while others wore abayas to complete the theme. The men wore […]]]>

JEDDAH/RIYADH: As the sun set on Friday evening, people gathered at Jeddah Art Promenade to enjoy the Saudi National Day celebrations.

The nation’s dark green and white flag was seen everywhere and many children wore matching clothes. Some women wore crystals on their faces while others wore abayas to complete the theme. The men wore wigs and carried flags.

A parade began as the sun set and the city cooled, its departure heralded by a distant roll of drums beckoning visitors to their feet.

People enjoy at an event in Jeddah Art Promenade. (A photo)

The small group marching along the Jeddah waterfront were dressed mostly in white. Graceful dancers led the way, followed by drums that helped stir people’s spirits. In the center was a man walking on stilts and dressed in the classic Saudi attire of a thobe and headband, or “igaal”.

“It always arouses a sense of patriotism when I visit events like these that take place on National Day,” 24-year-old Mariam Mohammad told Arab News.

“I dragged my family out of the house today. The crowds and traffic were what were stopping them, but we only have one night of the year to celebrate and I wasn’t going to let it go. pass,” she said.

Aitzaz Zayn, a Pakistani expat living in Jeddah, said: “I’m not from Saudi Arabia, but I always like to go out and join in the celebrations. There is something very beautiful about people coming together and celebrating their country. »

The Jeddah parade was just one of many events held throughout the day.

Military parade

The Royal Saudi Navy’s parade took place on Jeddah’s Corniche on Friday and large crowds gathered to cheer it on as part of celebrations for the 92nd Saudi National Day.

The fun started with an HZ-MS16 helicopter flying over the waterfront as onlookers were told all about it via a commentary played over loudspeakers.

Saudi security forces hold a military parade marking the Saudi National Day. (SPA)

One of the most powerful aircraft in the Royal Navy, the helicopter is designed for use in search and rescue operations as well as having anti-submarine capabilities.

A number of vessels designed for surveillance, search and rescue and assistance operations were also on the waterfront for people to see.

Salha Al-Shamrani and her daughter Hind visited the show together and were impressed with what they saw.

“It was such an interesting National Day event this year,” Al-Shamrani told Arab News.

Saudi Arabia celebrates the 92nd National Day with a massive air show. (SPA)

“We learned so much from the live audio and watching the tanks and boats. The kids learned a lot too.

“There is nothing like the Saudi Royal Navy. My husband is an instructor there, so we know how the rescue operations are going,” she added.

Hind also found the event informative.

“It was such a beautiful and rich participation from which I learned a lot. The parade was also a lot of fun,” she said.

“We could see the ships, tanks, submarines, etc. I learned their types and what each is for.

joy in the park

A spectacular range of activities are offered at Prince Majid Park in Jeddah to mark the Saudi National Day.

The party started on Wednesday and will continue through Saturday, with visitors treated to a host of family and community events to celebrate the Kingdom’s culture and diversity. These include folk dances, incredible traveling performances, a musical fountain show, heritage-focused trade and craft stalls, and plenty of delicious food.

People enjoy at an event in Jeddah Art Promenade. (A photo)

Amr Alyamani, Deputy Venue Manager, said, “We are trying to improve the National Day experience for everyone throughout the weekend. Our aim is to create as much joy and excitement as visitors are mesmerized by the attractions and the musical fountain that plays every 30 minutes.

“The stage performances will also reflect the rich history and captivate the audience with a memorable performance centered on diversity and togetherness,” he added.

“This year, we aim to signify our national journey by acknowledging our past, rejoicing in the present and together looking positively towards our future.”

Saudi Tennis Federation coach Alexia Tashbaeva took part in the celebrations.

Young people can learn and connect with their heritage and culture during Saudi National Day celebrations. (A photo)

“We are here in the park to introduce the sport to children. This way we encourage younger generations to come and play with us,” she said.

“As an outsider, these festivals portray the strength of unity and provide an opportunity to bring people together to share our love of sport with residents.”

Saeed Baqar, flautist, said: “Celebrating this special national occasion is an affirmation of our role as inspiring and creative artists to present traditional Saudi music in a contemporary way.

Tickets for the event cost SR30 ($8) and visitors can also shop for National Day souvenirs and dine at the food stalls.

Family Fun in Riyadh

On Friday, Grassy Park in Riyadh’s diplomatic district hosted a host of National Day activities, including horse shows, carnival games and giveaways.

Nabil Cho, a South Korean working in the Kingdom, was among those who took advantage of all the pleasures on offer.

“I didn’t expect an event like this to happen on a national holiday,” he told Arab News. “It’s my first time visiting here and I’m really excited and really enjoying my time here. It’s beautiful, it’s wonderful.”

People gathered at Majid Park in Jeddah during Saudi National Day celebrations. (A photo)

Cho said he heard about the National Day festivities online and invited some of his South Korean friends and colleagues to join him.

Olivier Pierre, a French tourist, was in Grassy Park with his wife and friends.

“I think this event is very interesting because I am just discovering the Saudi culture. Today is the National Day and I am very interested to know more about cultural dances and music, that’s why I am here and it is above my expectation,” he said. -he declares.

“My wife is also very interested in learning about Saudi culture. She discovered this place in the Saudi group event chats.

In addition to the action-packed activities, food stalls and shops sold traditional dishes and goods to visitors, many of whom wore festive attire.

All Grassy Park activities are open to the public from 5 p.m. to midnight on Saturdays.

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the art gallery of new south wales reveals its opening program https://alove4art.com/the-art-gallery-of-new-south-wales-reveals-its-opening-program/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 20:07:06 +0000 https://alove4art.com/the-art-gallery-of-new-south-wales-reveals-its-opening-program/ Step inside the newly expanded Art Gallery of New South Wales The Art Gallery of New South Wales has unveiled its new exhibitions, collections and first Tank commission with artist Adriàn Villar Rojas, as part of the Modern Sydney Project directed by SANAA. The opening programme, featuring works by over 900 Australian and international artists, […]]]>

Step inside the newly expanded Art Gallery of New South Wales

The Art Gallery of New South Wales has unveiled its new exhibitions, collections and first Tank commission with artist Adriàn Villar Rojas, as part of the Modern Sydney Project directed by SANAA. The opening programme, featuring works by over 900 Australian and international artists, will be free to visitors when the art turns museum opens December 3, 2022. Located on Gadigal Country, overlooking Sydney Harbour, the expanded art museum comprises the new building and the existing late 19th century building, connected by an art garden.

“The much-loved existing building has been revitalized with beautifully renovated spaces restoring architectural features and a completely relocated collection in all galleries. Visitors can travel through time, ideas, human stories and contested histories,’ share the gallery.

Art Gallery of New South Wales director Dr Michael Brand says: ‘My vision for the modern Sydney project was to transform the art gallery into an art museum campus with seamless connections between art, architecture and landscape; a generous and intelligent art museum that believes that the art of the past is crucial to understanding the art of our time.’

‘Wall Drawings #955’ by Sol LeWitt in the gallery’s John Kaldor Family Hall
image © Art Gallery of New South Wales, Christopher Snee

Offering the world seen from Sydney, the opening program contributes to critical global conversations. Visitors will encounter works across campus that engage, inspire, provoke and delight. Among the recent acquisitions and commissions by artists exhibited for the first time are Khadim Ali, Karla Dickens, Jeffrey Gibson, golden samara, Barkley L Hendricks, Kimsooja, Simone Leigh, Sanne Mestrom, Elizabeth Pulley, Shireen Tawell, Howie Tsui and justene williams.

In the end, the SANAA-designed extension of the art gallery of new south wales’almost doubles our exhibition space and, with a more porous connection between indoors and outdoors, offers new types of spaces for new thinking and new forms of art,’ comments Dr. Brand.

the art gallery of new south wales opening program will be directed by adrián villar rojas

The ‘Tank’ area, a former WWII bunker
image © Art Gallery of New South Wales, Jenni Carter

Adrián Villar Rojas revealed as inaugural artist

Arts and Tourism Minister Ben Franklin also announced that Argentine-Peruvian Adrián Villar Rojas would be the inaugural artist in charge of the underground gallery known as “Tank”. Located on the lowest level of the new building, the 2,200 m² former World War II oil tank, which has become a spectacular exhibition space, will be brought to life by Villar Rojas’ immersive work, “The End of the ‘imagination’, which will be unveiled when it opens in December.

The project is the culmination of a four-year engagement with the art gallery and is sure to immerse visitors in the world of Villar Roja. The artist is best known for his site-specific collaborative sculptures, including the intervention on The encounter’the roof of New York in 2017.

Villar Rojas, who visited the art gallery for the first time in 2018, says: ‘The project that has grown over the next four years is the product of many hands, many minds, many conversations, many questions and many mediums, including the virtual and the physical. And one of the most important mediums has been time – time to linger in a space, to talk with everyone from archivists to Indigenous curators to conservators, to push ideas and technologies, and to integrate into the project the conditions of a world that has changed massively.

the art gallery of new south wales opening program will be directed by adrián villar rojas

live environmental simulation generated by ‘Time Engine’ software | © Adrian Villar Rojas (2022)
image courtesy of the Art Gallery of New South Wales

Completion of Art Gallery of New South Wales expansion not only offers more art for more people, but also unveils a hidden treasure – an old WWII naval fuel tank masterfully repurposed into a world-class exhibition space, where visitors will be able to view this first Commission Tank, The End of Imagination,’ Franklin Stocks. ‘Adrián is internationally recognized for his expansive site-specific installations that provide immersive artistic experiences. On behalf of the NSW Government, it is with great pleasure that I welcome you to discover its work from December 3rd.

the art gallery of new south wales opening program will be directed by adrián villar rojas

Villar Rojas during his visit to the ‘Tank’
image © Art Gallery of New South Wales, Mim Sterling

captivating new spaces and exhibitions to discover

Nine bold and captivating new commissions that will be displayed inside and outside the new building include Francis Upritchard’s “Here Comes Everybody,” a trio of playful pairs of bronze beings that will greet visitors in the Welcome Plaza; “Bial gwiyuŋo” (the fire is not yet lit) by Jonathan Jones, a living work at the heart of the expanded art gallery; Lisa Reihana‘s (Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Hine, Ngāi Tū) moving image work ‘GROUNDLOOP’, overlooking the central atrium; Richard Legerthe ‘Onsite’ multi-panel painting, and Yayoi Kusamas “Flowers” ​​that bloom in the cosmos, which will be placed prominently on the stepped terrace overlooking Woolloomooloo Bay.

Upon entering the new building, visitors will be greeted by the inaugural exhibition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art in the new Yiribana Gallery. The collection celebrates the ideas of generosity and caring and emphasizes the connections between people.the art gallery of new south wales opening program will be directed by adrián villar rojas

Yiribana gallery installation view
image © Art Gallery of New South Wales, Jenni Carter

Other exhibits include: Dreamhome: stories of art and shelters – artists reflect on ‘home’ from their own richly local perspectives while recording the shared hopes and anxieties that are felt in many places today; make worlds – showcasing ideas of cartography, time, creation and connection centered around Kimsooja’s monumental participatory work Archive of mind in the large columnless gallery; and Outlaw – celebrating the anti-heroes of popular culture in the Art Gallery’s first gallery dedicated to new media.

Meanwhile, ‘From here, for now’ presents works in ten curated rooms and begins with outback Australia as a signifier of national identity, linking it to American stereotypes of foreigners and hidden histories, through works by Charlene Carrington, Rosemary Laing, Robert MacPherson, Richard Prince and Kaylene Whiskey. It also presents a new commission, Simryn Gill’s major new work ‘Clearing’, responding to elements of the natural history of the site of the new building.

the art gallery of new south wales opening program will be directed by adrián villar rojas

top: “Rally” (2014) by Nike Savvas, wall: “Solstice” (1974) by Lesley Dumbrell in the 20th century galleries
image © Art Gallery of New South Wales, Christopher Snee

Complementing the exhibition are 20th century galleries showcasing works from the art gallery’s Australian and international collections that highlight the connections and distinctions between local artists and wider global developments during some of the most tumultuous, exciting and innovative decades in history of art and humanity. This new exhibit includes Ken Unsworth’s recreation of “Suspended Stone Circle II”, with 103 river stones each weighing around 15kg suspended by 309 threads, now suspended on two levels for the first time in the newly unveiled atrium.

Visitors can also enjoy asian lantern – with the “Correspondence” exhibition marking important moments in Asian art and history, and “Elemental”, which studies the natural elements of earth, water and fire. Last but not least, the Large Courts focuses on the Art Gallery’s historic collections, brought to life by contemporary voices that encourage moments of pause and reflection.

the art gallery of new south wales opening program will be directed by adrián villar rojas

‘Suspended stone circle II’ (1974-77, 1988) by Ken Unsworth in 20th Century Galleries
image © Art Gallery of New South Wales, Christopher Sneethe art gallery of new south wales opening program will be directed by adrián villar rojas

20th century galleries installation view
image © Art Gallery of New South Wales, Christopher Snee

project info:

Last name: NSW Art Gallery – part of the Sydney Modern Project

location: Sydney, Australia

architecture: SANAA

inaugural artist: Adrian Villar Rojas

featured artists: 900+

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Leamington Art Gallery’s upcoming exhibition will tell the story of how two men overcame barriers to their emotional health and well-being through their work https://alove4art.com/leamington-art-gallerys-upcoming-exhibition-will-tell-the-story-of-how-two-men-overcame-barriers-to-their-emotional-health-and-well-being-through-their-work/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 12:18:57 +0000 https://alove4art.com/leamington-art-gallerys-upcoming-exhibition-will-tell-the-story-of-how-two-men-overcame-barriers-to-their-emotional-health-and-well-being-through-their-work/ Image by Neil Catley An artist and a photographer hold an exhibition at a Leamington art gallery to tell how they both overcame barriers to their emotional health and well-being through their work. A Happy Tale, at ArtsTrail Gallery in the Royal Priors shopping centre, is a collaboration between Leamington roller skater and artist Alan […]]]>
Image by Neil Catley

An artist and a photographer hold an exhibition at a Leamington art gallery to tell how they both overcame barriers to their emotional health and well-being through their work.

A Happy Tale, at ArtsTrail Gallery in the Royal Priors shopping centre, is a collaboration between Leamington roller skater and artist Alan Grantham and Coventry-based architectural photographer Neil Catley.

Alan creates metaphorical art as an expression of his view of the environment, people and the world.

He is influenced by modernist artists such as Joan Miró and Piet Mondrian and expresses it on paper, canvas, boards, the street, the wall or anywhere he can create images – even on his roller skates.

He will be sketching and painting live daily at ArtsTrail Gallery throughout the exhibition, delivering talks about his experience with ADHD telling how expressing his art has helped him overcome barriers to life. health and helped bring together a community of people through Hope Arts Projects (HAP), which empowers individuals to express themselves and be confident in a fluid environment.

Alan is doing a sponsored 100K skate at Victoria Park next month to support the charity ILeap, which supports children and adults with additional learning needs and disabilities.

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In pictures: Pupils at Leamington School produce artwork to pay tribute to Queen E…

Neil, whose latest work incorporates Warwickshire architecture, suffered from mental health issues and agoraphobia for five years and didn’t leave the house until one day he picked up a camera bought by his mother.

He began to learn to take pictures on a regular basis, which eventually allowed Neil to walk out of the house, with a new purpose given to life.

Her self-confidence led not only to the development of her own photographic practice, but also to an initiative offering activities to members of the community suffering from isolation or mental health problems.

Confidence through photography set up by Neil has been a great opportunity for others to develop their photography skills, make friends and build their confidence too.

Neil will lead tours around Leamington from the gallery on Saturday 22nd October.

A Happy Tale runs from Tuesday, October 4 through Saturday, November 5.

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Brad Pitt makes surprise debut as a sculptor at Finnish Art Gallery | Sculpture https://alove4art.com/brad-pitt-makes-surprise-debut-as-a-sculptor-at-finnish-art-gallery-sculpture/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 00:59:00 +0000 https://alove4art.com/brad-pitt-makes-surprise-debut-as-a-sculptor-at-finnish-art-gallery-sculpture/ Most know him for his blockbuster movies, chiseled cheekbones and high-profile connections, but Brad Pitt can now add sculpting to his list of accomplishments after showing his first works of art publicly at a seaside museum. of a lake in Finland. The A-list Hollywood star unveiled the sculptures – what he called a “radical self-inventory” […]]]>

Most know him for his blockbuster movies, chiseled cheekbones and high-profile connections, but Brad Pitt can now add sculpting to his list of accomplishments after showing his first works of art publicly at a seaside museum. of a lake in Finland.

The A-list Hollywood star unveiled the sculptures – what he called a “radical self-inventory” – at the Sara Hildén Art Museum in Tampere, a move that came as a surprise. This is the first time that the “largely self-taught” artist has presented his sculptures to the public, specifies the gallery.

Pitt, 58, unveiled the sculptures himself on Saturday as part of a larger exhibition by British artist Thomas Houseago, alongside a series of ceramics by Australian musician Nick Cave. “For Nick and me, it’s a new world and our first entrance. It feels good,” the actor told Finnish TV channel Yle during the opening ceremony.

From nine works by Pitt on display is Aiming At You I Saw Me But It Was Too Late This Time, a cast plaster panel “depicting a shootout” between eight figures, including hands, feet and faces attempting to break through the structure from different angles. There is also a series of house-shaped silicone sculptures that were shot with a different caliber of ammunition, as well as the actor’s first sculpture, House A Go Go, a miniature house made of tree bark and held together with tape.

“For me, it’s a question of self-reflection. It’s about knowing where I went wrong in my relationships, where did I misstep, where am I complicit. » Pitt said at the opening. “For me, it was born out of owning what I call a radical inventory of myself, getting really brutally honest with myself and considering those I may have hurt, the times I come to deceive me.”

The actor reportedly started dabbling in pottery after his divorce from Angelina Jolie, spending up to 15 hours a day at Houseago’s Los Angeles studio in 2017. Reports indicate he invited Leonardo DiCaprio to his studio during the filming of Once Upon a Time in Hollywood to “bond over their shared love of pottery.”

pitt too told GQ in August that he considered his practice of ceramics not as an art, but as a “solo sport, very silent and very tactile”. But his participation in the Finnish exhibition had not been announced before.

“In that sense, it’s exciting and wonderful,” said chief curator Sarianne Soikkonen. She added that Houseago’s decision to include her friends in her exhibit was shaped by the pandemic and events in Houseago’s personal life.

Pitt isn’t the first actor to turn to art. From Pierce Brosnan to Sylvester Stallone and Jim Carrey, the rich and famous have often sought new creative outlets to supplement their daily work. Last summer, Johnny Depp earned more than $3.6 million within hours after releasing 780 prints through Castle Fine Art gallery in London, which sold out almost immediately, according to the gallery.

Regardless of trends, Guardian critic Jonathan Jones said Pitt is proving to be an “extremely impressive artist” who has avoided the embarrassment of celebrity art “to reveal what, by any measure, are mighty and worthwhile works”.

The show also features Cave’s first exhibition of ceramics. The musician, who studied painting at Melbourne’s Caulfield Institute of Technology before branching out into music, has created 17 hand-painted ceramic figurines representing “the life of the devil in 17 stations”, a nod to his interest in Victorian Staffordshire Flatback figurines, of which he is a collector.

Pitt and Cave created their works in dialogue with Houseago, who has been practicing for almost three decades. For his first exhibition in the Nordic countries, the artist presents a number of paintings – although he is better known as a sculptor – by his great Visions series inspired in part by Edvard Munch.

Speaking about his decision to host a collaborative show between himself, Cave and Pitt, Houseago said in a statement, “I’m not an I. I’m a US!”

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