Artwork – A Love 4 Art http://alove4art.com/ Thu, 12 May 2022 08:01:13 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://alove4art.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/icon-2022-02-04T222405.121-150x150.jpg Artwork – A Love 4 Art http://alove4art.com/ 32 32 Ray never wanted to wake up. Now he’s planning his next work of art https://alove4art.com/ray-never-wanted-to-wake-up-now-hes-planning-his-next-work-of-art/ Thu, 12 May 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://alove4art.com/ray-never-wanted-to-wake-up-now-hes-planning-his-next-work-of-art/ Normal text sizeLarger text sizeVery large text size Imagine seeing your GP and instead of a pharmaceutical prescription, they refer you to an art class or suggest you join a community choir. It may seem like an old-fashioned notion from the 1970s, but “prescription arts” is a growing movement in the treatment of poor mental […]]]>

Imagine seeing your GP and instead of a pharmaceutical prescription, they refer you to an art class or suggest you join a community choir. It may seem like an old-fashioned notion from the 1970s, but “prescription arts” is a growing movement in the treatment of poor mental health; in Britain and other countries, it has been found to improve participants’ well-being and lead to lower healthcare costs.

From left, artist Abdul Abdullah with participant Ray and Space 22 host Natalie Bassingthwaighte.

Now Professor Katherine Boydell of Australia’s Black Dog Institute is investigating whether engaging in arts-based activities can help here. One in five Australians are thought to experience symptoms of poor mental health in any given year. As part of the study, a new ABC documentary, Space 22, features seven strangers between the ages of 18 and 66, whose experiences of mental illness range from anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, and who participate in a range of creative endeavors over six episodes. Boydell measures their results throughout, and they’re supported by Sydney psychotherapist Noula Diamantopoulos, who specializes in art-based therapy.

Hosted by singer Natalie Bassingthwaighte, the series also features visual artists Wendy Sharpe and Abdul Abdullah and singer-songwriter Eddie Perfect. Bassingthwaighte has struggled with mental health issues for years and was thrilled to be involved.

Natalie Bassingthwaighte hosts Space 22:

Natalie Bassingthwaighte hosts Space 22: “I felt like everything I’ve been through so far, I’ve been through to get here.″⁣

“I felt like everything I had been through up until now, I had been through to get to this,” she says. Although she says she hasn’t “hidden” to discuss her mental health, it has never “been front and center”.

“I was nervous to be that person – what it would look like, how could it play out in my career – so I wasn’t saying everything like I feel comfortable enough to do today. I now think it’s so important to talk about it because so many of us are going through it.

All participants emerged from the experiment with a higher sense of well-being (according to Black Dog’s scientific measurements), but perhaps none experienced such a drastic turnaround as Sydney man Ray, 66. (participants are only known by their first names).

Vivienne and Ray embraced the arts after participating in <i>Space 22</i>.” loading=”lazy” src=”https://static.ffx.io/images/$zoom_0.162%2C$multiply_0.4431%2C$ratio_1.5%2C$width_756%2C$x_131%2C$y_82 /t_crop_custom/q_86%2Cf_auto/0970c3d7892b481e49b47159c320b8472f439a17″ height=”224″ width=”335″ srcset=”https://static.ffx.io/images/$zoom_0.162%2C$multiply_0.4431%2C$ratio_1.5 %2C$width_756%2C$x_131%2C$y_82/t_crop_custom/q_86%2Cf_auto/0970c3d7892b481e49b47159c320b8472f439a17, https://static.ffx.io/images/$zoom_0.162%2C$multiply_0.8862%2C$ratio 2C$width_756%2C$x_131%2C$y_82/t_crop_custom/q_62%2Cf_auto/0970c3d7892b481e49b47159c320b8472f439a17 2x”/></picture><figcaption class=

Vivienne and Ray embraced the arts after participating in Space 22.Credit:Louise Kennerley

At the start of the series, Ray, a retired engineer who suffered abuse as a child resulting in a life of depression and anger, says he wakes up each morning disappointed at having lived through the night; apart from his daughter and granddaughter, he finds little to enjoy in life. “I’ve always been a stranger, I’ve always felt alone or lonely,” he says. It’s hard to see. But at the risk of cliché, through the six episodes of the documentary, you can really see the light come back to Ray’s eyes.

In recent years, Ray has found help in the form of trauma-based therapy, but anything artistically remote was way off his radar. “I always thought the arts were a waste of money,” he says. “I thought if shit ever hit the fan with the world, the arts was the first thing that could lose funding because we didn’t really need it. I was pretty wild about it – I just thought that it was a waste of time.

He came to the project through a call in a men’s mental health Facebook group. It was through the Black Dog Institute that he found the type of therapy to help him and he was eager to help others. “I just wanted to stand up for men’s mental health,” he says, adding that he couldn’t imagine getting anything out of it himself. “I came in with the attitude that the arts were just a goofy thing.”

But after 10 days of exercises including drawing, painting, photography and songwriting, Ray is a complete convert; be part of Space 22 was a real revelation.

“I make art every day now,” he says. “My living room now looks like Wendy Sharpe’s studio! I take full advantage of it. I may be sitting here doing something else and feel like getting up and putting a few more brush strokes on the canvas, or doing another drawing.

He enters art competitions and even has a favorite visual artist (emerging British artist Adam Riches); Space 22 changed him immeasurably.

“When I go to bed now, the last thing on my mind is what my next piece is going to be about,” he says. “And I have no problem getting up and feeling like doing something. The first thing that comes to mind now is, well, I’m going to do some art today and then I I’m going to start cleaning. It really surprised me how much I’ve changed.

Eddie Perfect, who has spent his life working in the arts, isn’t so surprised. “Human beings have danced, sung and created…instinctively since humans have existed; it’s in us to be creative,” he says.

Songwriter Eddie Perfect helps participants <i>Space 22</i>including Vivienne and Ray, to write their own song.” loading=”lazy” src=”https://static.ffx.io/images/$zoom_0.145%2C$multiply_0.4431%2C$ratio_1.5% 2C$width_756%2C$x_391%2C$y_57/t_crop_custom/q_86%2Cf_auto/8e19447f98498b1acfdcb20ded34260f9745ed9b” height=”224″ width=”335″ srcset=”https://static.ffx.io/images/$zoom_0.145% 2C$multiply_0.4431%2C$ratio_1.5%2C$width_756%2C$x_391%2C$y_57/t_crop_custom/q_86%2Cf_auto/8e19447f98498b1acfdcb20ded34260f9745ed9b, https://static.ffx.io/images/$45%2C_0.1 $multiply_0.8862%2C$ratio_1.5%2C$width_756%2C$x_391%2C$y_57/t_crop_custom/q_62%2Cf_auto/8e19447f98498b1acfdcb20ded34260f9745ed9b 2x”/></picture><figcaption class=

Songwriter Eddie Perfect helps participants Space 22including Vivienne and Ray, to write their own song.

In a way, Perfect, who spent two days helping participants write a song together, says this Space 22 trying to measure is something that is inherently known to all human beings.

“Participating in a group is good for the human psyche. It teaches people to listen, to collaborate, to share, to be generous, to risk, to fail, to express what you think and feel,” he says.

Engaging in creativity for fun, rather than a professional or monetary outcome, he says, is something we should all be doing. “Just pure creativity without all that bloody X-Factor bullshit. Not that, just people anointed by those imaginary gods as the person chosen to sing or dance or perform, and if you’re not one of those people , you sit down, shut up and leave that to the talented people. We don’t do that with sports or math,” he says. “There’s no other human endeavor where we don’t expect that. that people participate without being professional, with the exception of the arts – and that’s ridiculous!”

Vivienne, another program participant, says that after a few days with the group, she felt something inside her change. “I did talk therapy for years – debriefing of incidents and situations – but no art or music, and I loved it. It was a form of self-expression that I had never tapped into before,” she says. “I had no idea what it was going to do to my brain, but I had some big breakthroughs.”

A former scientist, Vivienne, 55, is a survivor of childhood sexual abuse, addiction and homelessness. She always loved music and looking at paintings, but had never picked up a brush herself. Since Space 22art is now part of his daily life.

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“The producers gave us all a nice art kit as a thank you, then all my friends gave me art supplies, so I painted a lot – it’s a really good way to connect” , she says. “We all need more than just sitting in a room talking about our trauma. That’s part of it, but it can isolate. Hope people will get [from the program] that when you come together as a group, regardless of where you come from, there is a huge amount of healing power in there. It was all so uplifting.

Although, as happened with some of the participants halfway through the experiment, there were some weak spots.

Creativity, says Perfect, isn’t necessarily just a pleasant experience. “Things that confront and frustrate, hard to overcome… for me, that’s what creativity is – reducing it to something resembling, walking in a meadow among beautiful flowers sells it open. I think creativity is a real workout, not just for the joy receptors in our body, but also for things like frustration, pain and anger – that’s where art comes into its own” , he said.

“I think we want stimulating, engaging and rewarding complexity in our lives and art can give people that.”

Space 22 premieres on ABC May 17 at 8:30 p.m.

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Smithsonian adopts new policy for returning artwork to rightful owners https://alove4art.com/smithsonian-adopts-new-policy-for-returning-artwork-to-rightful-owners/ Wed, 11 May 2022 14:34:11 +0000 https://alove4art.com/smithsonian-adopts-new-policy-for-returning-artwork-to-rightful-owners/ Photos.com/GettyImages The Smithsonian has announced a brand new policy to ensure unethically obtained artwork is returned to its rightful owners. The museum’s new “ethical return policy” will allow its institutions to return objects acquired through what would be considered unethical means, according to The Art Newspaper. Going forward, museum objects deemed to have been looted, […]]]>

Photos.com/GettyImages

The Smithsonian has announced a brand new policy to ensure unethically obtained artwork is returned to its rightful owners.

The museum’s new “ethical return policy” will allow its institutions to return objects acquired through what would be considered unethical means, according to The Art Newspaper.

Going forward, museum objects deemed to have been looted, coerced or otherwise unethical will be subject to a new set of criteria. Many of these items will be shipped back to their country of origin.

This will give each of the Smithsonian’s 21 locations the opportunity to decide how to deal with artwork obtained through unethical procurement, as each varies widely.

This new policy is being implemented at a time when many cultural institutions are being forced to consider the colonial histories that have shaped their collections.

“There is a growing understanding at the Smithsonian and in the museum world in general that our possession of these collections carries certain ethical obligations to the places and people from which the collections originate,” Smithsonian Secretary Lonnie Bunch said. , in a press release.

“Among those obligations is to consider, using our contemporary moral standards, what should be in our collections and what should not. This new Ethical Returns Policy is an expression of our commitment to uphold those obligations,” Bunch continued.

Typically, when dilemmas regarding a museum’s collection have arisen in the past, many Western institutions have claimed full ownership of the objects in their possession. The Smithsonian’s new policy, however, contrasts sharply with this long-standing practice.

“The Smithsonian is this incredible marvel – this gift not just to the country but to the world. It’s really important that we show leadership,” he told the New York Times.

The implementation of the “ethical return policy” comes just after the Smithsonian agreed to return its collection of Benin Bronzes to Nigeria in March, according to NPR. These works of art were stolen by the British army in 1897 and distributed throughout the north of the world.

According to The Art Newspaper, since many museums have bronzes from Benin, they have served as catalysts for broader discussions about the repatriation of unethical objects.

Some items being considered for return include pottery from the National Museum of Natural History that comes from an excavation site in Turkey and dates back to the ancient city of Troy. Another piece includes a photo of a black jazz musician at the National Museum of American History, reports The New York Times.

TOPICS: Smithsonian Libraries and Archives

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Rare ancient work of art discovered under house in Turkey https://alove4art.com/rare-ancient-work-of-art-discovered-under-house-in-turkey/ Tue, 10 May 2022 23:02:01 +0000 https://alove4art.com/rare-ancient-work-of-art-discovered-under-house-in-turkey/ An unexpected find has revealed ancient artwork that was once part of an Iron Age complex beneath a house in southeastern Turkey. The unfinished work shows a procession of deities that describes how different cultures came together. Looters first broke into the underground complex in 2017 by creating an opening in the ground floor of […]]]>

An unexpected find has revealed ancient artwork that was once part of an Iron Age complex beneath a house in southeastern Turkey. The unfinished work shows a procession of deities that describes how different cultures came together.

Looters first broke into the underground complex in 2017 by creating an opening in the ground floor of a two-storey house in the village of Başbük. The chamber, carved into the limestone rock, extends 98 feet (30 meters) below the house.

When the looters were arrested by authorities, a team of archaeologists carried out an abbreviated salvage dig to investigate the significance of the subterranean complex and the art on the rock panel in the fall of 2018 before erosion set in may further damage the site. What the researchers found was shared in a study published Tuesday by the journal Antiquity.

Archaeologists followed a long stone staircase to an underground chamber, where they found rare artwork on the wall. Credit: C. Uludag

The artwork was created in the 9th century BC during the Neo-Assyrian Empire, which began in Mesopotamia and grew to become the greatest superpower at the time.

This expansion included Anatolia, a large peninsula in western Asia that includes much of modern Turkey, between 600 and 900 BC.

“When the Assyrian Empire exercised political power in southeastern Anatolia, Assyrian rulers expressed their power through art in the courtly Assyrian style,” said study author Selim Ferruh Adali. , associate professor of history at Ankara University of Social Sciences in Turkey, in a statement.

An example of this style was sculpted monumental rock reliefs, but Neo-Assyrian examples have been rare, the study authors wrote.

Combine cultures

The work of art reflects an integration of cultures instead of a pure and simple conquest. The deities have their names written in the local Aramaic language. The images depict religious themes from Syria and Anatolia and were created in the Assyrian style.

“It shows how in the early phase of Neo-Assyrian control of the region, there was local cohabitation and symbiosis of Assyrians and Aramaeans in one region,” Adali said. “The Başbük panel gives scholars studying the nature of empires a vivid example of how regional traditions can remain vocal and vital in the exercise of imperial power expressed through monumental art.”

The work shows eight deities, all unfinished. The tallest is 3.6 feet (1.1 meters) tall. Local deities in the work include the moon god Sin, the storm god Hadad, and the goddess Atargatis. Behind them, researchers were able to identify a sun god and other deities. The depictions combine symbols of Syrian-Anatolian religious significance with elements of Assyrian depiction, Adali said.

Part of the work features Hadad, the storm god, and Atargatis, the main goddess of northern Syria.

Part of the work features Hadad, the storm god, and Atargatis, the main goddess of northern Syria. Credit: Mr. Onal

“The inclusion of Syro-Anatolian religious themes (illustrates) an adaptation of Neo-Assyrian elements in ways not expected from earlier finds,” Adali said. “They reflect an earlier phase of Assyrian presence in the region when local elements were more emphasized.”

Upon discovering this work of art, study author Mehmet Önal, a professor of archeology at the University of Harran in Turkey, said: “As the dim light of the lamp revealed the deities, I trembled in awe when I realized I was confronted with the very expressive eyes and majestic face of the storm god Hadad.”

The mysteries remain

The team also identified an inscription that may indicate the name of Mukīn-abūa, a Neo-Assyrian official who served during the reign of Adad-nirari III between 783 and 811 BC. Archaeologists suspect that he had been assigned to this area at the time and was using the complex as a way to gain appeal from the locals.

But the structure is incomplete and has remained unfinished all this time, suggesting that something prompted the builders and artists to abandon it – perhaps even a revolt.

“The panel was made by local artists in the service of the Assyrian authorities who adapted Neo-Assyrian art into a provincial context,” Adali said. “It was used to perform rituals overseen by provincial authorities. It may have been abandoned due to a change in provincial authorities and practices or due to political-military conflict.”

Adali was the epigraphist on the team that read and translated the Aramaic inscriptions in 2019 using photos captured by the research team, who had to work quickly to study the site.

“I was shocked to see Aramaic inscriptions on such works of art, and a feeling of great excitement came over me when I read the names of the deities,” Adali said.

The site was closed after the 2018 excavations because it is unstable and could collapse. It is now under the legal protection of the Turkish Ministry of Culture and Tourism. Archaeologists look forward to continuing their work when excavations can safely resume and capture new images of the artworks and inscriptions and possibly uncover other artworks and artifacts.

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Check out the ROBOT that can paint your child’s artwork on your car https://alove4art.com/check-out-the-robot-that-can-paint-your-childs-artwork-on-your-car/ Tue, 10 May 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://alove4art.com/check-out-the-robot-that-can-paint-your-childs-artwork-on-your-car/ IF YOU HAVE kids, you probably have some of their artwork attached to your fridge. But what about your car? Not glued, but actually painted – by the most advanced robots of their kind on the planet. 1 ABB robot will be able to paint any artwork on your car This is what a company […]]]>

IF YOU HAVE kids, you probably have some of their artwork attached to your fridge.

But what about your car? Not glued, but actually painted – by the most advanced robots of their kind on the planet.

1

ABB robot will be able to paint any artwork on your car

This is what a company called ABB will offer, which has developed a robot with 1000 nozzles capable of reproducing the most complex works of art.

Its robots are already painting cars in factories around the world, but its latest has been tested in a secret facility so far and will start painting customer cars within the next two years.

Car customization is big business, with some Rolls-Royce customers spending hundreds of thousands of pounds to get their car exactly the way they want it.

Painting is one of them, but until now, the reproduction of very complex works of art has been difficult to achieve.

But the idea is that you won’t need to be a Rolls-Royce buyer to get this new service. It will also be available for mainstream cars.

Former Jaguar and Aston Martin designer Ian Callum said: “There are so many cars on the road, and you know, they all look a lot alike.

“People want customization. The offering of this painting is absolutely
amazing because it offers a very individual look for any car, and a very personal look too.

Before, it would be a messy process to maybe put an envelope on it, which I always feel uncomfortable with.

“I think real paint on a car is the way to go. So this offers everything
sorts of new levels of individual design for an automobile. In fact, it’s amazing.

“I can see that applying to cars that you and I might buy. I think that’s extremely exciting.

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To promote the new robot, ABB commissioned eight-year-old child artist Advait Kolarkar, whose abstract works have sold
for over £100,000.

Advait, who was named one of the world’s top 100 child prodigies, painted his “Zebra Utopia” commission on a canvas on the floor of his studio at his home in India.

It was then scanned for the robot to paint over the car.

Advait said, “I couldn’t believe a robot was painting an artwork for the first time.

“And it wasn’t just any work of art. It was my work.”

Putin
A huge change for tenants will be announced TOMORROW
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Kentucky Artists Submit Works to Exhibit at the State Capitol https://alove4art.com/kentucky-artists-submit-works-to-exhibit-at-the-state-capitol/ Mon, 09 May 2022 14:18:00 +0000 https://alove4art.com/kentucky-artists-submit-works-to-exhibit-at-the-state-capitol/ The Beshears believe there is no better place for the voices of Kentuckians to be represented through art than in the Capitol. FRANKFORT, Ky. – Kentucky artists are invited to submit their work for a possible exhibition at the State Capitol. Selected artwork will be on display for six months in the Capitol’s two main […]]]>

The Beshears believe there is no better place for the voices of Kentuckians to be represented through art than in the Capitol.

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Kentucky artists are invited to submit their work for a possible exhibition at the State Capitol.

Selected artwork will be on display for six months in the Capitol’s two main halls and the Team Kentucky Digital Art Gallery before being returned to artists, a statement from Governor Andy Beshear said.

Governor Beshear and First Lady Beshear believe there is no better place for the voices of Kentuckians to be represented through art than on Capitol Hill.

The deadline for submitting works for the Fall 2022 exhibition is June 3, and pieces will be on display from July 1 through December 31. The rotation of works currently on display ends on June 30.

This will be the third rotation of artwork featuring Kentucky artists at the Capitol. The project was started last year as a way to express Kentucky pride and connect through art during the coronavirus pandemic.

Art Submission Requirements:

  • Artists may submit two works of art for consideration, but must complete separate applications for each.
  • Works must be at least 18 inches by 20 inches in size (including frame) and cannot exceed 48 inches in width. The maximum depth allowed is 4 inches and the maximum weight is 25 pounds.
  • Works should be framed if possible.
  • The works can be landscapes, portraits or abstracts.
  • The following information must be included in your submission: your name; address, including city and county; phone number; E-mail; the title of the artwork; and the size of the work (including the frame). You can also include the URL if you have a website where your art is displayed.
  • Artists can also rate if the work is for sale.

If you would like to submit your work, you can find more information on the gallery’s website.

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CVCC students create artwork for Catawba County parks | Local News https://alove4art.com/cvcc-students-create-artwork-for-catawba-county-parks-local-news/ Sun, 08 May 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://alove4art.com/cvcc-students-create-artwork-for-catawba-county-parks-local-news/ According to staff reports Advertising artwork by three students from Catawba Valley Community College was selected to represent the Catawba County park system. The county’s communications and marketing team invited CVCC advertising and graphic design students to create a series of four-piece artworks depicting each of the county’s four parks: Bakers Mountain, Riverbend, St. Stephens […]]]>

According to staff reports

Advertising artwork by three students from Catawba Valley Community College was selected to represent the Catawba County park system.

The county’s communications and marketing team invited CVCC advertising and graphic design students to create a series of four-piece artworks depicting each of the county’s four parks: Bakers Mountain, Riverbend, St. Stephens and the soon to be opened Mountain Creek Park.






A beaver gnawing on a tree and a mountain bike were chosen by CVCC students to represent Mountain Creek Park.


Provided by Catawba County


The students formed teams of three and created artwork based on information from Catawba County and tours of the park, a statement from Catawba County said.

The winning designs were created by Stephanie Huitron, Gideon Hart and Maddie Barrymore. Their art encapsulated the animals and plants seen in each of the four parks: a black bear represents Bakers Mountain, a bald eagle represents Riverbend Park, a dog represents St. Stephens Park, and a beaver represents Mountain Creek Park.







Riverbend.png

The artwork created by Catawba Valley Community College students Stephanie Huitron, Gideon Hart and Maddie Barrymore depicts Riverbend Park in northeast Catawba County.


Provided by Catawba County


The artwork is made up of short lines inspired by impressionist paintings, the statement said.

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Huitron, Hart and Barrymore presented their designs to the Catawba County Board of Commissioners on May 2. The artwork will be used for county promotional and marketing materials.

“We have been incredibly impressed with the high quality of work developed by the three student agencies throughout this process,” Amy McCauley, Catawba County’s director of communications and marketing, said in the release. “The winning students stunned everyone on the panel with their unique artistic approach to the designs, which have a ‘wow’ factor that makes them truly special. We had an excellent experience working with all the students involved in this project, and we are grateful to them and to the faculty of the AGD (Advertising + Graphic Design) program for the opportunity to collaborate.

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An artist turns old jewelry into a new work of art | Mississippi News https://alove4art.com/an-artist-turns-old-jewelry-into-a-new-work-of-art-mississippi-news/ Sun, 08 May 2022 05:01:00 +0000 https://alove4art.com/an-artist-turns-old-jewelry-into-a-new-work-of-art-mississippi-news/ By NICOLE LAYTON, The Commercial Dispatch COLUMBUS, Miss. (AP) — Brenda Hancox has always been artistic. As a former employee of the Commercial Dispatch in the 1960s and 1970s, she worked with the photo pages, creating collages of images of the Golden Triangle. “Before, I was doing all sorts of things. I was doing bigger […]]]>

By NICOLE LAYTON, The Commercial Dispatch

COLUMBUS, Miss. (AP) — Brenda Hancox has always been artistic.

As a former employee of the Commercial Dispatch in the 1960s and 1970s, she worked with the photo pages, creating collages of images of the Golden Triangle.

“Before, I was doing all sorts of things. I was doing bigger pictures than others and trying different things,” she recalled of the pages she created, during an interview with The Dispatch.

One day, while talking about her pages with editor Birney Imes Jr., Hancox found a nugget of truth that she still carries with her.

political cartoons

“He said I had an artistic sense of arrangement,” she laughed. “I guess that’s what I still do today.”

Now retired, Hancox makes art that incorporates costume jewelry. They range from turtles to seahorses to framed pieces featuring initials, words or other shapes.

“I take all these old pieces — they might be missing a few jewels in a setting or they might be broken — and try to balance the colors and the pieces,” she said.

Hancox said she started working with jewelry in the 1960s when spoon rings became popular. She put the hobby aside for a while and traveled in retirement before returning to the Golden Triangle a year and a half ago.

“I found a bag of parts I used to sell and put together a piece of art,” Hancox said. “After it was sold, I felt the need to do something and I’ve been making jewelry ever since.”

It takes about three to four hours to make a piece, depending on the size. Although she makes some parts using templates by aligning parts to work within outlines, she also creates custom parts.

“Once, I brought in a lady whose sister had died. She had all her fancy jewelry on and asked me if I could do something with it,” Hancox said. “She saw a bouquet I had made for someone else. I made a garden of jewelry that she could hang on her wall to remind her of her sister instead of having it all stuck in a drawer.

Other pieces she had made included an owl from clock parts and a mermaid that features an antique bracelet that Hancox wore when she worked as a buyer at Ruth. She also makes angels and crosses.

Hancox said she had friends who helped her find jewelry for her pieces. She also looks for them when shopping.

“I now look at old jewelry and try to imagine where I can put it in a piece or what I can do with it,” she said.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Artist Elena Bulatova donates artwork from ‘Toy Collection’ to honor teachers https://alove4art.com/artist-elena-bulatova-donates-artwork-from-toy-collection-to-honor-teachers/ Sat, 07 May 2022 13:16:14 +0000 https://alove4art.com/artist-elena-bulatova-donates-artwork-from-toy-collection-to-honor-teachers/ Las Vegas, USA – May 7, 2022 — The Heart of Education Award for Teachers at CCSD is a special honor to celebrate the unsung heroes of Clark County in Las Vegas. Organized by the Smith Center for Performing Arts, with support from the Rogers Foundation and the help of the public, this annual award […]]]>

The Heart of Education Award for Teachers at CCSD is a special honor to celebrate the unsung heroes of Clark County in Las Vegas. Organized by the Smith Center for Performing Arts, with support from the Rogers Foundation and the help of the public, this annual award is an honor of which internationally acclaimed artist Elena Bulatova is honored to be a part. The event celebrates educators who not only go above and beyond, but truly make a difference in the lives of their students. The purpose of this award is to show recognition of outstanding efforts in education and to appreciate teachers, a group of individuals who do not always receive the gratitude to which they are duly entitled.

This recognition of merit touches Bulatova closely, as she contributes significantly to philanthropy and community events. Bulatova believes in having a positive, meaningful and lasting impact on the Las Vegas community. With this in mind, Elena Bulatova is proud to donate 20 works of art from her distinguished “Toy Collection” to honor these chosen educators.

Elena Bulatova’s “Toy Collection” represents the most beautiful days of childhood. The playfulness of the color, the nostalgic reference to size, and the delightful nod to childhood shapes all serve to see the world through the bright eyes of an inspired child. Youth, education and orientation are important to Bulatova, as she started painting at a young age, and the arts were an integral part of her growing up time.

The 20 works of art donated by Elena Bulatova to The Heart of Education award serve as a positive symbol to commemorate these teachers who shape the lives of young people. As Bulatova herself said about creating works of art, the same can be said of educators: “When you like something, you appreciate it, and you never work a day in your life .”

Contact information:
Name: Elena Bulatova Fine Art LLC
Email: Send email
Organization: Elena Bulatova Fine Art Las Vegas
Address: 3720 South Las Vegas Boulevard, Las Vegas, NV 89109, USA
Phone: +1-760-812-9234
Website: https://www.elenabulatovafineart.com/

Build ID: 89074613

If you detect any problems, problems or errors in the content of this press release, please contact [email protected] to let us know. We will respond and rectify the situation within the next 8 hours.

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The work of schoolgirls wins a prestigious competition https://alove4art.com/the-work-of-schoolgirls-wins-a-prestigious-competition/ Fri, 06 May 2022 23:06:10 +0000 https://alove4art.com/the-work-of-schoolgirls-wins-a-prestigious-competition/ A SELFIE with a difference has won a talented Barrhead schoolgirl a prestigious award. Corinne Deeney, 15, won the Intermediate category at the Royal Scottish Academy (RSA) Schools Art Awards after impressing the judges with a self-portrait. This year’s competition attracted over 1,000 entries from 48 schools across Scotland, with just 28 youngsters winning. Corinne, […]]]>

A SELFIE with a difference has won a talented Barrhead schoolgirl a prestigious award.

Corinne Deeney, 15, won the Intermediate category at the Royal Scottish Academy (RSA) Schools Art Awards after impressing the judges with a self-portrait.

This year’s competition attracted over 1,000 entries from 48 schools across Scotland, with just 28 youngsters winning.

Corinne, who is a fourth year student at Barrhead High, said she was delighted with her success.

Corinne’s award-winning art

“The theme of the painting is self-reflection and I painted it in watercolor with colored pencil on top,” she told Barrhead News.

“I was ecstatic and so surprised to have done so well against tough competition.

“My work is inspired by Swedish artist Linnea Strid and her hyper-realistic oil paintings.

“This award inspired me to pursue a career in art.”

Corinne has enjoyed drawing and painting since she was around three years old, her natural abilities being quickly noticed by her parents Chris and Marie, both 46, as well as her teachers.

His interest in art also includes cartoons and fantasy, creating characters, masks and home figures.

Chris said that Corinne comes from a creative family.

“We always had a lot of art supplies at home because her older sister is also very artistic, as is her younger sister,” he added.

“His mother, as well as his grandfather and various other relatives, have the same artistic talent.

“Corinne is however very modest about her talent and has so far only participated in art competitions organized by her school, excluding that of the RSA.

“Marie and I are very proud of her achievement and, although we have always known how talented she is, it is perhaps only now, after winning this prestigious award, that we have realized how much she has talent.”

The RSA Schools Art Award has existed since 1986 and is open to all secondary and special needs schools across Scotland.

Supported by Scottish law firm Brodies LLP, the awards recognize work that demonstrates creativity, originality and technical and observational skill.

An exhibition of the winning works, including Corinne’s self-portrait, can be seen online at royalscottishacademy.org/exhibitions/238/overview until Tuesday May 31.

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Ocean Grove discusses the artwork “Up in the Air Forever” https://alove4art.com/ocean-grove-discusses-the-artwork-up-in-the-air-forever/ Fri, 06 May 2022 02:42:09 +0000 https://alove4art.com/ocean-grove-discusses-the-artwork-up-in-the-air-forever/ Ocean Grove released their third album Up in the air forever last week, the long-awaited 2020 sequel Flip phone fancy. While retaining the raucous spirit of previous versions, Up in the air forever sees increased experimentation from the band, mixing in hard rock and grunge. “This record is definitely a departure from our heavier side,” […]]]>

Ocean Grove released their third album Up in the air forever last week, the long-awaited 2020 sequel Flip phone fancy.

While retaining the raucous spirit of previous versions, Up in the air forever sees increased experimentation from the band, mixing in hard rock and grunge.

“This record is definitely a departure from our heavier side,” drummer Sam Bassal explained. “We had a unique chance to dictate what our group would look like when we moved Dale (Tanner) to the leader position. It’s a chance that a lot of bands don’t have, and they might end up feeling stuck in a certain path they’ve always been on.

We had the opportunity to say, ‘All right, what are our strengths going forward?’ And for us, that meant extending the heavy foundations we had built for ourselves.

As the record’s manifesto says, “The power is in the shoes.” The shoe in question is the colossal sneaker that dominates the Up in the air forever cover. And while it’s at the center of the rocker’s new album, it’s not just any normal shoe: it’s a vessel for personal freedom and unbridled creativity, all that Ocean Grove stands for.

To mark the release of the album, we asked Twiggy Hunter from the band to guide us in the creation of Up in the air foreverthe memorable cover art, which had some very unexpected influences.

And if you fancy experiencing the power of the shoe in person, Ocean Grove will embark on the Flip Phone In The Air tour this month, performing across Australia before hitting the Full Tilt stage throughout of the month of July (all the details here).

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Ocean Grove’s “Up in the Air Forever” is out now.

For more on this topic, follow Indie Observer.

The concept

The concept for Up in the air forever was a natural process, every little gesture fell into place organically. We originally thought about the whole concept of the album as a whole, like how we could play it throughout the campaign and where each individual song would fit in the album, largely because we relied on the whole “playlist” rather than an overall album with the songwriting for this one.

We try to get away with it as much as possible by writing a good mix and variations of sounds and songs rather than just having a linear sound throughout the album. If you’ve listened to it, you’ll know what I mean – there’s a lot of ups and downs and we really needed something to complement that on the cover.

I came to see the boys one day after having had an idea in mind for a while…it was the idea of ​​bringing a real world element to life through the actual concept of the album and the artwork, and represented throughout the campaign. I didn’t necessarily know what it would look like, if it would be sportswear or if it would be an Ocean Grove brand that we were doing or something like that.

One reference in particular was the film Like mike where he puts on his shoes and he becomes a person in a world where he can do and be whoever he wants. Once we had locked in the idea that the shoe was the object of the real world for Up in the air foreverwe started to brainstorm ideas on how we could include that on the album cover itself.

Art

The artist for Up in the air forever, Brent Engstrom, is actually an artist for Topp, the trading card company, and they do a whole bunch of collectibles and stuff. I’ve followed his work for years, since he’s been the official Garbage Pail Kids artist, and I’ve always loved Garbage Pail Kids.

For this album, we brainstormed and it wasn’t necessarily super pressing, but when it came to finding a critical moment, I just threw Brent in the mix and showed the boys his work. . And right away, they were kind of like, “Fuck! His business is so sick!

Obviously it’s Garbage Paul Kids that shines through, but his style is so nostalgic. Even if someone wasn’t necessarily into Garbage Pail Kids as a kid, they’re still recognizable for that specific cartoon style. It just unlocked a part of my childhood when I saw those cards, I was so obsessed!

Cheek

The power is in the shoe: The OddWorld 3000

When we incorporated the shoe into the artwork to Up in the air forever, we had some initial ideas that were, I guess, very “beige” versions of what he eventually became. For example, we had thought of the shoe itself with classic Apple ads, with similar text and things like that. Sam and I were going back and forth on ideas, and I just didn’t feel it.

Another idea I threw into the mix earlier was that the shoe has devil horns, angel wings and a devil tail, sort of playing on the idea of ​​the “devil on the shoulder, angel on the other”. Going back to Brent Engstrom, I’ve always wanted to do an Ocean Grove cartoon or cartoon, and I was a big fan of his work and his style, so I said to the boys, ‘And if we had the shoe? coming from the OddWorld to the real world, and Sam, Twiggy, and Dale walk out of the OddWorld with the shoe.

The shoe, or the OddWorld 3000, represents the user or wearer, as well as the OG fan who is in the OddWorld with us, as they have been transformed into their best and truest form. And they’re in there living OddWorld and it’s all fucking raw and real.

We believe it’s in these raw times and times of adversity that people truly grow and become their best selves, and that experience is represented by the shoe coming from OddWorld with the three members of Ocean Groves. The shoe comes out clearly, ready to race and ready to take on the world – and we’re here with it.

Honey, we blew up Oddworld 3000

A little extra inspiration came from the Honey, I reduced the children series, I loved all these films when I was a child. One of the ideas I think I originally sent to Sam Bassal was the cover of Honey, I blew the kid, which has this hovering massive shoe and the dad looks shrunken and tiny. It’s such a classic movie, and the inspiration came from seeing those kinds of movies when I was a kid in the early 90s and early 2000s. Back then a lot of Hollywood movies were still making things and physical, real-life props rather than anything now so digital.

That cover with the giant shoe and the movie itself was so obnoxious, and there are these behind-the-scenes photos of it – the shoe was as big as a car next to the guy! They really didn’t take any shortcuts, you know? And I always wanted to do shit like this, I really miss those days jurassic park movies and all that.

They actually made huge dinosaur heads and things that looked so real, and as a kid after seeing all those movies, I was always amazed at the props. I always thought I wouldn’t mind doing a few things like that myself. Obviously we weren’t able to make a car-sized OddWorld 3000, but I think we might have to do something like that, maybe for a stage show or something thing like that!

Globally

the Up in the air forever the artwork and the album itself are as simple as that: we’re here with the fan, ready to take on the fucking world with them, and support them with whatever they want to do and who they want to be , and just really allowing people to be themselves. And we want to show them that if they really want something, they can get it. But only if they wear the OddWorld 3000 of course.

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