Art gallery – A Love 4 Art http://alove4art.com/ Thu, 12 May 2022 04:01:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://alove4art.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/icon-2022-02-04T222405.121-150x150.jpg Art gallery – A Love 4 Art http://alove4art.com/ 32 32 On the home front: The National Art Gallery of Malaysia reopens in 2022 with a brand new look, state-of-the-art services and an exciting line-up of exhibitions. https://alove4art.com/on-the-home-front-the-national-art-gallery-of-malaysia-reopens-in-2022-with-a-brand-new-look-state-of-the-art-services-and-an-exciting-line-up-of-exhibitions/ Thu, 12 May 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://alove4art.com/on-the-home-front-the-national-art-gallery-of-malaysia-reopens-in-2022-with-a-brand-new-look-state-of-the-art-services-and-an-exciting-line-up-of-exhibitions/ Jeffrey Lim (born in 1978, Kuala Lumpur)Dinding Potret Kanta2014 – 2017Hand print on silver resin coated paper, tin cans, mounted on oxidized zinc panel After a series of extensive refurbishments which began in August 2020, the National Art Gallery is delighted to reopen its doors in mid-May 2022 with a stellar range of on-site and […]]]>

Jeffrey Lim (born in 1978, Kuala Lumpur)
Dinding Potret Kanta
2014 – 2017
Hand print on silver resin coated paper, tin cans, mounted on oxidized zinc panel

After a series of extensive refurbishments which began in August 2020, the National Art Gallery is delighted to reopen its doors in mid-May 2022 with a stellar range of on-site and online exhibitions for everyone to enjoy. delight in it.” – YBhg. Dato’ Indera Dayang Fatimah Tom Abangsaufi, Chairman, National Visual Arts Development Board (NVADB)

– The National Art Gallery reopens in mid-May after undergoing a panopticon renovation which began in August 2020. These renovations include an all-new gray asphalt roof and, to provide viewers with an all-encompassing gallery experience, the 7 existing main galleries (Reka, Tun Razak, 2A, 2B, 3A, 3B and Portrait Gallery) is further enhanced by a brand new gift shop, cafe and the fully equipped “Art Hospital”.

The National Art Gallery, affectionately known to Malaysians as ‘The Broom’, is set to wow art lovers with a selection of specially curated exhibitions: NUSA, SINGLE and a digital art exhibition ‘WALKING THROUGH A SONGLINE” to name a few.

NUSA

Conceived last year as a primary entry point to 2022, NUSA includes more than 400 works drawn from the National Collection and highlights cross-sectional segments that include historiography, mythology, the social fabric of superdiversity, and the local wisdom presented in 5 galleries – Reka, Tun Razak, 2A, 2B and 3B. NUSA explores superdiversity-related impressions in national and regional contexts, curated to provide engaging cognitive content for visitors, and emphasizes visual perceptions of relevance, curation, interactivity, and digitization .

The selection of works will include masterpieces steeped in the idea of ​​NUSA, such as River Pergau State of Kelantan, painted in the 19th century by William Samwell; Kampung Nelayan, (Fishing Village) a distinguished Chinese brush painting by Chung Chen Sun which has been listed as national heritage under the National Heritage Law of 2005; an iconic collection by pioneers Latiff Mohidin, National Laureate Syed Ahmad Jamal, Redza Piyadasa, Chuah Thean Teng and the most recent acquisition, a contemporary interpretation of the Enrique de Malacca Memorial Project (2016) by Ahmad Fuad Osman.

SINGLE

A nod to accomplished young contemporary artists who have created high-impact, solid works from striking and monumental perspectives, and made significant contributions nationally and internationally, SINGLE spotlights new works spanning sculpture , mixed media, installation and two-dimensional offerings. This year, the 3 artists selected for SINGLE are Shafiq Nordin, Red Hong Yi and Saiful Razman.

Presented in the main hall of the Museum, these works are intended to “welcome” visitors and welcome them for an exciting year ahead. This exhibition also serves as a platform for research and dialogue and will be accompanied by support programs. SINGLE debuts in mid-May and ends in January 2023.

WALK IN A SONG LINE

Organized by the National Museum of Australia and Mosster Studio with the National Art Gallery, this collaboration, with support from Aboriginal Traditional Keepers, the Australian High Commission, the Australian Government and the Australia Now programme, is an immersive digital art exhibition which celebrates Australian Indigenous arts, culture and innovation. .

WALKING THROUGH A SONGLINE is a contextual multimedia experience based on an element of the internationally acclaimed exhibition Songlines: Tracking the Seven Sisters from the National Museum of Australia. This groundbreaking show follows in the footsteps of the Seven Sisters Tjukurrpa (Dreaming) through the Western and Central Deserts of Australia as they are pursued. Curated by Professor Margo Neale, Head of the New Indigenous Knowledge Center and Indigenous Curator and Senior Advisor to the Director of the National Museum of Australia, Margo is a co-recipient of 7 Australian Research Council grants in collaboration with the Australian National University, Yale University and the University of Victoria.

unknown artist
Hotel Lukisan Lama Heritage Station, Stesen Keretapi Tanah Melayu Bhd circa 1940
Oil painting on isorel wood

ART HOSPITAL

Collecting and curating is one of the main business interests of the National Art Gallery. Under Law 724, the institution aims to be the primary repository of the national artistic heritage that collects, preserves, maintains, exhibits, and promotes art and instills awareness, understanding, and appreciation of art.

After more than 60 years, the practice of art collecting has grown exponentially with the increase in the number of artists, collectors in private and public galleries and educational institutions across the country. Inspired by this development, the National Art Gallery formed the National Art Repository and Conservation Center – ART HOSPITAL, offering consultation services, preventive and curative conservation, art condition reports, research on materials and storage of works of art.

Approximately 3,000 works of art from the National Collection are kept at controlled room temperature in the Depot for Works of Art on Paper and 1,500 paintings in various media are kept at the Paint Depot.

Providing first class art conservation services and storage facilities for collectors and artists being the core business of ART HOSPITAL, the conservation of paintings is taken care of by the highly experienced staff of the unit Collection and conservation of the National Art Gallery. State-of-the-art laboratory facilities operating at optimum levels in this 348 m2 laboratory provide treatments such as cleaning, tear repair, image reintegration and lining. The laboratory is equipped with instruments such as the polarized light microscope and X-ray fluorescence which are useful for more detailed conservation work.

A total of 160 pull-out shelves, each measuring 10′ x 11′ are provided for storing works of art belonging to collectors and artists. Each artwork is stored here in accordance with the terms and conditions of the Artwork Repository Rental Agreement and protected by insurance at a certain price.

The National Art Gallery will also announce the winners of Young Contemporaries (Bakat Muda Sezaman BMS21) when it officially opens. This prestigious and coveted competition which began in 1974 was won by Zulkifli Mohd. Dahalan with its flagship entry “Halaman Rumah Kami”. In 2019, Samsudin Wahab won the main prize with his historical installation “Rambu-Rambu Memori”. Since 2000, the National Art Gallery has held the competition every two years, and for its 26th edition, a new concept has been introduced to adapt to the pandemic situation. “Art on Site” (Seni di Lokasi) gives artists the autonomy to create works in all states of the country, resulting in alternative exhibition spaces in Volta. Entrants’ works will not be exhibited at the National Art Gallery, but rather in locations of their choice – this format allows for virtual locations such as links, portals, apps, animated works, performing arts and even more. Along with two main prizes, Young Contemporaries 2021 will award additional prizes, 3 each for Online Visitors’ Choice and Onsite Visitors’ Choice.

Another exciting introduction to the new Balai is the hybrid space located in the lobby of the administration building where art industry players have the freedom to present their works digitally. The National Art Gallery equips them with televisions and projectors, allowing artists to exhibit and promote their art while engaging potential buyers. This is in line with the National Art Gallery’s mission to fuse art with the latest trends.

Founded in 1958, the National Art Gallery is one of the oldest art museums in Southeast Asia and houses one of the largest collections in the region, totaling more than 4,500 works of art. It has held numerous exhibitions since its inception, showcasing selections from its permanent collection and the National Collection of Malaysia, which has been entrusted to the museum.

The National Collection is a vast repository of visual information, encompassing all aspects of human activity. Built over the past six decades, the collection has not only grown into a body of uniquely local knowledge, but also distinctively regional, given Malaysia’s position at the heart of Southeast Asia, a sprawling region with a long history of migration and home to diverse Asian cultures. The term “superdiversity” can apply not only to the multi-ethnic population of Malaysia or the peoples of Southeast Asia, but also to the aesthetic aspirations found in the works of the National Collection.

Ameruddin Ahmad, Managing Director of National Art Gallery Sums, “We strive to achieve certain goals with our permanent exhibition: the diversity of this art collection is seen from all horizons of artistic production intentions – artistic expressions, visual narratives, rituals, functions and persuasions. it’s also about repositioning the art collection in the exhibition other than the original reasons it was designed for, it’s to create new meaning and most importantly to make it still relevant to people who see it now .

URL link: https://www.artgallery.gov.myen/homepage/

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The Hippodrome art gallery holds a mirror for its latest opus https://alove4art.com/the-hippodrome-art-gallery-holds-a-mirror-for-its-latest-opus/ Wed, 11 May 2022 00:00:05 +0000 https://alove4art.com/the-hippodrome-art-gallery-holds-a-mirror-for-its-latest-opus/ The Hippodrome Art Gallery could be confused with the streets around it with its latest update, “Hipp Humans: A Collection of Stories from the Humans of Gainesville,” unveiled April 22. The free exhibit features a snapshot of the Gainesville community, focusing on strengths large and small. He was inspired by “Humans of New York”: a […]]]>

The Hippodrome Art Gallery could be confused with the streets around it with its latest update, “Hipp Humans: A Collection of Stories from the Humans of Gainesville,” unveiled April 22.

The free exhibit features a snapshot of the Gainesville community, focusing on strengths large and small. He was inspired by “Humans of New York: a website and book by author and photographer Brandon Stanton that portrays people on the streets of New York.

Participants can browse 25 portraits and their corresponding stories in the gallery. The exhibit also includes an interactive wall allowing patrons to answer hard-hitting questions about their own lives.

HippHumansGNV is a instagram-Hippodrome marketing initiative with an accompanying art gallery that brings the project to life. The goal is to share the stories of members of the Gainesville community through their portraits and interviews.

Grace Munroe, a 22-year-old graphic designer and marketing intern at the Hippodrome, composed the project by interviewing, photographing and telling stories of various Gainesville residents who play a leading role – whether in the community or in their personal presentation.

Investigators asked for life advice or important memories to start the conversations, but the subjects’ excitement generally drove the rest.

“People like to talk about themselves,” said Le-Alem Getachew, 25, marketing associate at the Hippodrome. “They will go away.”

The Hipp Humans Project connects its star citizens and highlights their pivotal roles in painting the Gainesville portrait.

One of the subjects of the exhibit is Cristina Cabada Sidawi, a 22-year-old local cook, DJ and vintage clothing dealer. She expressed her admiration for the work of HippHumans.

“It’s a really cool portrait of what the community of Gainesville is like and how different it is, and how everyone comes from different backgrounds and identities and different spaces,” Sidawi said.

HippHumans is managed by Munroe and Getachew. Although Getachew originated the idea, Munroe led the project. The duo’s marketing goal was to reach new demographics like younger audiences and those who might have suspended their presence and support during COVID-19.

The companion HippHumans Instagram gallery opened as the social media page’s launch party, though the overwhelming support from the community gave the exhibit life beyond itself. As such, the exhibition could extend its duration by a month further into the summer, according to Getachew.

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Visitors can expect the show to return in the fall just like Gainesville does: with new faces and a renewed style.

As for the origin of the subjects, the employees of the Hippodrome did not need to go far.

As a project heavily inspired by the connectivity and eclecticity of downtown Gainesville, Munroe and Getachew primarily scouted the Heartwood Soundstage Market, Depot Park, the Racetrack, and downtown in general.

Topics were selected both by importance to the community and by random impulse; Le-Alem refers to Bo Diddley’s beloved grandchildren, and Munroe describes that he picks on “quirky” people.

“There was a man on a bicycle who would talk about government for hours, and he was trying to get us to join a republic with him,” Munroe said.

Once the profiles and portraits were completed, they were whittled down to a diverse selection of the most successful interviews for printing and framing. The remaining profiles have been archived for eventual sharing on the exhibition’s Instagram.

Munroe, who majored in sustainability while attending UF, also purchased the frames of the used prints from local thrift stores.

“We didn’t want to buy frames, not only because we didn’t want to spend the budget, but because we’re very ‘used, support small stores,’ and stuff like that,” Munroe said.

The nature of thrifty frames also meant that they would not be uniform; an aspect that Munroe noted to represent the individuality of each member of the Gainesville community’s history and personality.

After compiling interviews and gathering executives, the exhibition was ready to open. When the exhibit opened, much of the crowd was made up of the project’s subjects, which created a real sense of community, Munroe and Getachew said.

“Maybe it was people I knew and some I didn’t know, but I got to know them all by walking through the exhibit and seeing all their framed photos and reading their stories,” Sidawi said. .

His colleague Laila Fakhoury, 24, co-founder of the Dion Dia label and co-owner of How Bazar, was similarly hit.

“There were people in there saying to me, ‘I don’t deserve to be in this gallery.’ There are so many amazing people that were included and it was such an honor to be a part of that,” Fakhoury said. “It was really beautiful and quite surreal as well.

The creators shared similar sentiments to Fakhoury.

“It was so cool because they were on the walls but they were walking around, so it was kind of surreal at first,” Munroe said. “It was as if the characters in a book were jumping off a page.”

However, representing another side of the humans of Gainesville was the downgrade of the interactive section later on opening night.

“This woman and her family or friends drew inappropriate pictures and things all over the posters. Fortunately, our cinema manager and our partner replaced him that night, so he didn’t see the general public,” Getachew said with a laugh.

Community support was not complicit, however; Munroe and Getachew were surprised by the love they received.

The expo opened at 6:30 p.m. and had a line of attendees at 6:25 p.m., Munroe said.

“We didn’t think anyone was coming,” Getachew said. “It was just lovely to see.”

HippHumans takes topic suggestions through their Instagram and the exhibit’s suggestion box. HippHumansGNV is not affiliated with the “Humans of Gainesville” FaceBook Page, a page also inspired by Brandon Stanton’s “Humans of New York.”.”

Contact Anna Ward at award@alligator.org. Follow her on Twitter @AnnaWard_.

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Exhibition of “captured” photos at the Pump House Art Gallery in Chillicothe https://alove4art.com/exhibition-of-captured-photos-at-the-pump-house-art-gallery-in-chillicothe/ Mon, 09 May 2022 10:43:00 +0000 https://alove4art.com/exhibition-of-captured-photos-at-the-pump-house-art-gallery-in-chillicothe/ This month’s exhibit at the Pump House Center for the Arts is a judged photography exhibit titled “Captured.” Kevin Coleman was present during the opening night Thursday evening May 5, 2022. Jared Mitten won Best Show with his large aluminum plaque of an Alaskan scene. He named the 46-second exposure of the Turnagain Arm shoreline, […]]]>

This month’s exhibit at the Pump House Center for the Arts is a judged photography exhibit titled “Captured.” Kevin Coleman was present during the opening night Thursday evening May 5, 2022.

Jared Mitten won Best Show with his large aluminum plaque of an Alaskan scene. He named the 46-second exposure of the Turnagain Arm shoreline, part of Cook Inlet, “Twilight.”

He doesn’t call himself a professional, but rather an “experienced amateur” who travels to take pictures.

Jared said he liked his other print better in the show, but the judge chose this one. He said, for him, the photo is more about the story of the shoot and his memories.

Douglas Crabtree calls his black and white print of two women lying on the floor of a forest, “Circle of Two”.

He said filming was like an expedition, taking them down a logging road on a township road on a county road in Lawrence County.

Crabtree says he wants his photos to be indatable. He photographs nudes in nature so there are no landmarks.

The show is in place until the end of the month, and some works are for sale. the pump house is Chillicothe’s free public art gallery in Yoctangee Park.

Kevin Coleman covers local culture and government

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The Tatham Art Gallery in Pietermaritzburg will hold an exhibition to remember the July Troubles https://alove4art.com/the-tatham-art-gallery-in-pietermaritzburg-will-hold-an-exhibition-to-remember-the-july-troubles/ Mon, 09 May 2022 00:07:11 +0000 https://alove4art.com/the-tatham-art-gallery-in-pietermaritzburg-will-hold-an-exhibition-to-remember-the-july-troubles/ The looted Brookside Mall being rebuilt in Pietermaritzburg. The Tatham Art Gallery, Pietermaritzburg, is holding a public participation exhibition where everyone affected by the Troubles is invited to participate and express their experiences and fears, as well as their hopes for the future. This will be done through photographs, words or poetry. The public participation […]]]>

The looted Brookside Mall being rebuilt in Pietermaritzburg.

The Tatham Art Gallery, Pietermaritzburg, is holding a public participation exhibition where everyone affected by the Troubles is invited to participate and express their experiences and fears, as well as their hopes for the future.

This will be done through photographs, words or poetry. The public participation exhibition is organized by the Tatham Art Gallery with the aim of healing the community and recognizing its resilience and intrinsic humanity.

How to participate :

Photographs

• Look through your photographs and identify images that tell a story or show the chaos, destruction and recovery from unrest in Pietermaritzburg in July 2021.

• Do not choose images that include identifiable people or car license plates involved in the looting.

• Print your photographs in A5 format. There is no limit to the number of submissions. The more submissions, the better.

• Digital Photo Express, Shop 15, Woodburn Square in Scottsville, has agreed to sponsor a special rate of R10 per A5 photograph printed as a submission for the exhibition.

Poetry and messages

• Write a comment, or a poem, or a message, on a sheet of A5 paper. It can be any response or reaction to how you were affected, how you felt, or how you survived the trauma.

Submission

• All entries must be dropped off at the Tatham Art Gallery no later than June 20 at 12:00 p.m.

• Works will be exhibited at the discretion of Tatham Art Gallery staff.

• Entries will not be returned after the exhibition, except by prior agreement.

• Contact reena.bhoodram@msunduzi.gov.za or 033 392 2823 for more information, or to get more details on how to enter. — WR.

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Where to See Art Gallery Exhibits in the Washington, DC Area https://alove4art.com/where-to-see-art-gallery-exhibits-in-the-washington-dc-area/ Fri, 06 May 2022 10:01:46 +0000 https://alove4art.com/where-to-see-art-gallery-exhibits-in-the-washington-dc-area/ Placeholder while loading article actions Japanese woodblock master Utagawa Hiroshige’s bold framing, perspective and other compositional techniques give his prints a cinematic appearance – even though he died in 1858, nearly four decades before the Lumière brothers were born. ‘expose the first animated image. The artist’s continued influence on cameramen and women is the focus […]]]>
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Japanese woodblock master Utagawa Hiroshige’s bold framing, perspective and other compositional techniques give his prints a cinematic appearance – even though he died in 1858, nearly four decades before the Lumière brothers were born. ‘expose the first animated image. The artist’s continued influence on cameramen and women is the focus of “Exploring Hiroshige and His Influence on Social Media” at the Japan Information and Culture Center. The exhibition combines classic prints by Hiroshige with contemporary photographs posted on Instagram.

The photos are taken by locals in the Washington DC area, but many depict Japan, where Aaron Webb and Alexis Rose found striking benefits on, respectively, an Osaka train station platform and a cat on a Nagasaki rooftop . The images, which include some views of DC, are presented in thematic pairs and arranged to demonstrate visual affinities with the 20 Hiroshige wooden blocks, all from the American University collection. The show also includes a tutorial on the characteristics of the engraver’s compositions, including symmetry, S-curves, and unusually low or high horizon lines.

These strategies enabled Hiroshige to portray everyday life as a kind of theatrical production, rich in vivid detail and staged for maximum impact. The artist has produced several series documenting various routes and locations, many of which feature large landscapes. But he often focused on ordinary objects or activities, whether alone or in the foreground to establish a human presence amid towering rocks or crashing waves. The show’s stills, shot mostly in urban areas, lack epic natural settings, but follow the engraver’s lessons well. Like Hiroshige, the photographers frame their vignettes so that each appears as a self-contained universe.

Exploring Hiroshige and his influence on social media Until May 13 at Japan Culture and Information Center1150 18th St. NW.

The Korean Cultural Center’s title of “Boundless” is exaggerated, but not by much. The exhibition presents the work of no less than 46 participants, members of the Association of Han-Mee Artists of Greater Washington, a Korean American band. Most of the highlights are sculptures, but the selection also includes paintings, prints and textile works.

Among the best-known contributors are Jean Jinho Kim, whose sculptures have become leaner and more powerful; his “Sanctuary” evokes the idea of ​​a house simply with two aluminum pipes, powder coated in contrasting colors and bent into the elementary contours of a house. Sookkyung Park’s hanging assemblage of curved paper pieces, inspired by his paper-walled childhood home, looks and feels totally different, yet thematically related. As for Ara Koh, it was the lack of buildings in the upstate New York city where the Seoul native came to study that prompted her landscape-evoking ceramic vase.

The often multilingual text features in pieces such as Hyun Chough’s robust and partly sculptural collage, whose two inset rectangles are filled with fragmentary blocks. In response to the pandemic, June Yun’s multimedia piece features small blocks of reverse text from The New Yorker magazine in a grid, on which she has painted yellow flowers. Delicate and diaphanous, flowers signify rebirth, even if only temporarily.

Without Borders Until May 16 at Korean Cultural Center2370 Massachusetts Avenue NW.

A fire-eater is a living subject for a photograph, but for her portrait, Amy Toensing didn’t just photograph directly. She emphasized the movement by positioning her camera at an oblique angle so that the flame crossed the image as a dramatic diagonal. Such clever compositional stratagems enhance many of the visual anecdotes in “Two Stories,” Toensing’s exhibit at Photoworks.

The first of the tales is life on the Jersey Shore. This includes images of spooky dwellings near the ocean, but focuses primarily on beach and boardwalk dwellers. Among the indelible images are a pair of young women in bathing suits, framed by headless naked male torsos in the foreground, and a trio of old friends in the shimmering waves, an immersive shot of immersion.

Toensing has traveled the world as a National Geographic photographer and documentary filmmaker. One of her themes is widowhood as it is experienced in traditional patriarchal societies, primarily but not exclusively in South Asia. Photos in this series include purely visual attractions such as milky light, fractured sunbeams and powdered pigments suspended in the air during Holi, the Hindu festival of colours. More disturbing are an intentionally blurred image of desperate widows seeking the promised three rupees to chant scriptures in a temple, as well as several studies of isolated widows, whether in an open courtyard or an enclosed space. Toensing’s compositional flair conveys perpetual loneliness as deftly as the bustle of the seaside.

Amy Toensing: two stories Until May 22 at photoworksGlen Echo Park, 7300 MacArthur Blvd., Glen Echo, Maryland.

Mozambican artist Lizette Chirrime creates art by assembling scraps of second-hand fabric and other found materials. Although this type of patchwork is generally considered humble, Chirrime’s themes are heroic and even cosmic. Among the pieces in his Morton Fine Art exhibition, “Rituals for Souls Search,” is “Somewhere on Earth,” in which strips of textile coalesce into a kind of globe. Most of the narrow ribbons flow from side to side of the tapestry, but those that approach the circle bend in orbit as if distorted by the pull of a black hole.

More typical of Chirrime compositions are those that focus on human figures, in two cases identified as single mothers. One of the lone matriarchs is positioned above a photo of a woman’s face and outlined by several sets of roughly parallel red dots. Equally expressive is “The Boy Who Stopped the Snake,” in which the child clutching a brown snake is a tattered silhouette in warm colors against a backdrop of blues and greens.

The poses of these paintings are intended to be festive and reflect the way in which the artist overcame his traumatic childhood. “I literally ‘stitched’ myself back together,” her statement explains. The use of scrap materials is an ecological statement and the imagery is often spiritual, but the essence of Chirrime’s art is autobiographical.

Lizette Chirrime: Rituals for Souls Until May 17 at Morton’s Fine Arts52 O St. NW, #302. Open by appointment.

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Travel back in time at the Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery https://alove4art.com/travel-back-in-time-at-the-tullie-house-museum-and-art-gallery/ Fri, 06 May 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://alove4art.com/travel-back-in-time-at-the-tullie-house-museum-and-art-gallery/ If you’ve ever relished the idea of ​​time travel, a visit to the Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery in Carlisle should be on your bucket list for a day. A stroll through its fascinating galleries and exhibits can make you feel like you’ve walked in the footsteps of a wide variety of people from […]]]>

If you’ve ever relished the idea of ​​time travel, a visit to the Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery in Carlisle should be on your bucket list for a day.

A stroll through its fascinating galleries and exhibits can make you feel like you’ve walked in the footsteps of a wide variety of people from our past.

Tullie’s Costume Collection, on permanent display, showcases 300 years of clothing worn by Cumbrian women.

It ranges from the bizarrely extravagant six-foot-wide court mantua dress of the 18th century to the scrubs worn by a nurse at Cumberland Infirmary in Carlisle during the Covid pandemic.

It is the largest collection of historical costumes in the north of England.

If you prefer your time travel to be more of swords and sandals, there are three exhibits covering Cumbria’s Roman history.

Some of the most captivating artifacts from the Roman Empire have been brought together under one roof as Tullie celebrates the 1900th anniversary of Hadrian’s Wall.

The ‘To The Edges Of Empire’ exhibit includes Newstead’s bewitching face mask – a bronze parade mask from the late 1st century AD.

For a real insight into Roman life in and around Carlisle you should check out the Uncovering Roman Carlisle exhibition which includes finds recently unearthed during last summer’s community excavations of the Carlisle Cricket Club’s Roman bathhouse, discovered at the origin in 2017.

And for a modern understanding of the continued importance of Hadrian’s Wall in our daily lives, take a stroll through Tullie Gardens.

Photographs of members of the public capturing precious moments spent in front of the historic wall are on display. The three Roman exhibitions run until June 12.

Your journey through time through Tullie House tells the stories of early prehistoric Cumbrians to Viking invaders. It covers Carlisle’s turbulent medieval history and its transformation from a rural market town to a bustling center of railways, industry and tourism.

Tullie is also home to an extensive collection of works of art and decorative art ranging from the Pre-Raphaelites to North Cumbrian artists, a natural science collection and individual treasures like the rare Amati Violin – an exquisite instrument dating from 1564.

The museum also has an award-winning family cafe that serves hot and cold food throughout the day.

With its central location in the heart of Tullie House, the cafe is ideally placed for a mid-visit pick-me-up before continuing your visit to the galleries.

On a nice day you can even take your refreshments and sit on the garden patio overlooking the peaceful and colorful gardens.

All in all, the Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery offers an unforgettable day on your doorstep.

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Gayndah Art Gallery in a former nunnery, a congregational space for Queensland’s oldest city https://alove4art.com/gayndah-art-gallery-in-a-former-nunnery-a-congregational-space-for-queenslands-oldest-city/ Wed, 04 May 2022 23:15:38 +0000 https://alove4art.com/gayndah-art-gallery-in-a-former-nunnery-a-congregational-space-for-queenslands-oldest-city/ If you venture outside the city limits, a wealth of creativity and artistry is on display in regional Queensland. It might just be a little harder to find. And while artists may have fewer resources in the regions, a gallery in Queensland’s oldest town, Gayndah, is trying to change the narrative. It caught the attention […]]]>

If you venture outside the city limits, a wealth of creativity and artistry is on display in regional Queensland. It might just be a little harder to find.

And while artists may have fewer resources in the regions, a gallery in Queensland’s oldest town, Gayndah, is trying to change the narrative.

It caught the attention of newcomers and visitors.

Housed in a former Catholic convent, the Gayndah Art Gallery has become home to the creative spirit of the town of North Burnett since it opened 10 years ago.

The gallery celebrated its 10th anniversary with an exhibition of the artists present at its opening.(ABC Wide Bay: Brad Marsellos)

Like the rest of regional Queensland, the town has seen strong growth in new residents.

For a city traditionally famous for its citrus fruits, its booming arts scene plays a big part in its vibrancy.

Regular events such as “paint and sip” and exhibition openings connect newcomers with longtime locals.

Gallery president Jane Glenn said newcomers have turned to the space.

Joan of Art
Jane Glenn exhibited her work through the gallery.(ABC Wide Bay: Brad Marsellos)

“I have half a dozen people who have come to the gallery who have recently moved to town, and they are joining the Gayndah Art Gallery as friends,” she said.

“They cannot fail to be impressed with the construction and quality of the artwork.”

Important community hub

The center is run entirely by the love of its volunteers and, although the space is small, it makes a big impression.

“I think it has encouraged many artists, young and old, to pick up their pens and brushes and create wonderful art,” Ms. Glenn said.

“I think that’s an extremely important asset to the community.”

The North Burnett region, west of Bundaberg, includes the towns of Gayndah, Biggenden, Eidsvold, Monto, Mt Perry and Mundubbera.

A historic photo of a convent under construction.
The former convent was built in 1919 and ceased to be a house for nuns in the late 1960s.(Provided: Gayndah Art Gallery)

Artist Susie Capewell has called Gayndah home since 2007 and was considering opening her own gallery when she heard about the space opening.

For Capewell, the gallery is the main reason she will always call Gayndah home.

“We all love each other.

“Our functions are like our little social gatherings.”

Having the ability to hang artwork on the wall has also been a big win for creatives in the region, with 60 exhibits hung since the gallery opened.

A woman looks aside with a painting of a dog behind her.
Artist Susie Capewell says the gallery makes Gayndah feel like home.(ABC Wide Bay: Brad Marsellos)

Art helps learning

The former convent is on the grounds of St Joseph’s Primary School and the school shares the building with the volunteers.

Ms. Glenn credits a former school principal with encouraging students to have access to the arts.

“The vision to turn this into an arts and culture center was Liam and Michelle Dougherty’s vision,” Ms Glenn said.

A woman works at an easel on a veranda.
Residents use the gallery space to meet and create.(ABC Wide Bay: Brad Marsellos)

“He said all the kids around Gayndah have wonderful opportunities around sports, great academic opportunities, but they haven’t had much exposure to arts and culture.

“We want to continue that interest.”

And it’s not just neighborhood kids that the gallery helps.

He recently launched the Arthur Marshall Emerging Artist Award to honor a deceased former volunteer, as well as to provide educational support with exhibits and funding.

Capewell says emerging artists in the city have seen the benefits of having a space dedicated to art and she encourages others to get involved.

Wedding dresses in an art gallery.
The gallery celebrated local history with an exhibition of wedding dresses from around the city.(Provided: Gaydnah Art Gallery)

“Even if they have little interest in art, come and attend one of our workshops,” she said.

“You may find that you have the spark there and want to go on and learn more.

“And that’s what we want to promote.”

Ms Glenn hopes the children who show their work now will return in the future to show their growth and share their stories through art.

“In 10 years, I would like to see their works hanging on these walls,” she said.

“I want to see them inspired to learn and take every opportunity they can.

“And then come back and exhibit their work in an exhibition.”

A group of women stand at a party in the gallery space.
The gallery hosts events such as the Gayndah Orange Festival party.(Provided: Gayndah Orange Festival)
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Multimedia creations by Leonard Beam exhibited at the Pinecone Art Gallery https://alove4art.com/multimedia-creations-by-leonard-beam-exhibited-at-the-pinecone-art-gallery/ Wed, 04 May 2022 05:02:00 +0000 https://alove4art.com/multimedia-creations-by-leonard-beam-exhibited-at-the-pinecone-art-gallery/ Leonard Beam opened the Pinecone Art Gallery in M’Chigeeng last year, but is looking forward to a boosted tourist season this summer. He is pictured here with some of his works. photo of Michael Erskine M’CHIGEENG—The walls of Pinecone Art Gallery in M’Chigeeng are adorned with an eclectic mix of mixed media artwork by Leonard […]]]>

Leonard Beam opened the Pinecone Art Gallery in M’Chigeeng last year, but is looking forward to a boosted tourist season this summer. He is pictured here with some of his works. photo of Michael Erskine

M’CHIGEENG—The walls of Pinecone Art Gallery in M’Chigeeng are adorned with an eclectic mix of mixed media artwork by Leonard Beam. Mr Beam opened the gallery located at the bottom of the hill in M’Chigeeng next to the former Susan Hare law firm.

“I actually started out wanting to learn how to paint furniture,” laughs Beam, who earned his BFA from Vancouver’s prestigious Emily Carr University of Art and Design. “I got hooked soon after I started classes,” he said. “I haven’t looked back since.”

Mr. Beam spent 20 years in Vancouver before returning home to M’Chigeeng. “It must be so expensive there,” he said. “It’s crazy.”

Although based in the west, the artist still moved around a lot and said he drew a lot of inspiration for his art from these trips, mainly to Canada, although he enjoyed a stay in Italy. . “I really like the west, especially the badlands,” he said. “Italy was amazing, the sculptures, not just one by one artist, but so many.”

Mr Beam comes from a family of artists, his brother, the late Carl Beam, was an internationally renowned artist whose works are exhibited at the National Gallery and his sister-in-law Ann Beam and niece Anong Beam are accomplished artists in their own right.

Mr. Beam hasn’t completely strayed from his own roots, with some of his art on functional furniture, while other platforms range from traditional canvas (“I stretch my own canvas”) to museum quality paper.

The price of his works ranges from several thousand dollars for larger format paintings to smaller works more accessible to a limited wallet. “I like to have something for everyone,” he said. “Not everyone has room for bigger paintings.”

To this end, Mr. Beam had some of his work reproduced in prints by OJ Graphix at Espanola. “It’s good to keep things local when you can,” he said.

One of his most popular formats are works mounted on small square panels.

The subjects of his works are wide ranging, usually juxtaposing divergent images to create a message to the viewer at their intersections.

Although he has the gallery/workspace on Highway 540 at the bottom of the hill leading to M’Chigeeng, Mr. Beam said he currently mainly works in his apartment. “It’s quiet in the winter, so I don’t bother going into the gallery if I don’t have to,” he says. “I plan to have internet here soon so I can set up my computer.”

Although the studio is expected to open around May, those wishing to come should make an appointment by calling 705-348-2770 or emailing leonardbeam@gmail.com.

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‘Solid progress’ on new Marlborough Library and Art Gallery https://alove4art.com/solid-progress-on-new-marlborough-library-and-art-gallery/ Wed, 04 May 2022 00:57:00 +0000 https://alove4art.com/solid-progress-on-new-marlborough-library-and-art-gallery/ Wednesday, May 4, 2022, 12:57 p.m.Press release: Marlborough District Council Work on the new Marlborough District Library and Art Gallery is moving indoors, as external and internal framing nears completion and the last ground floor windows are installed. The council’s director of projects and contracts, Maighan Watson, said “solid progress” had been made on the […]]]>

Work on the new Marlborough District Library and Art Gallery is moving indoors, as external and internal framing nears completion and the last ground floor windows are installed.

The council’s director of projects and contracts, Maighan Watson, said “solid progress” had been made on the building over the past month, and contractors were now working on the heating, ventilation and air conditioning, plumbing in bathrooms and data systems.

Inside, the installation of the wall coverings began with plywood on the interior walls of the new art gallery now completed.

“The contractor has reported that they are on schedule, with some items ahead of schedule,” Ms Watson said.

With the roof complete in early March, the next few weeks will see further exterior cladding and glazing. Construction of the building, led by Robinson Construction, is expected to be completed in December, followed by the interior fit-out.

When completed, the $20 million building – which received $11 million from the government’s Provincial Growth Fund and has been described by Mayor John Leggett as a ‘game changer’ for Blenheim’s CBD – will house the Marlborough District Library, the Millennium Public Art Gallery, a café and community meeting rooms available for hire.

© Scoop Media

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The Old Parcels Office art gallery in Scarborough has announced the winners of its first open exhibition https://alove4art.com/the-old-parcels-office-art-gallery-in-scarborough-has-announced-the-winners-of-its-first-open-exhibition/ Tue, 03 May 2022 14:41:00 +0000 https://alove4art.com/the-old-parcels-office-art-gallery-in-scarborough-has-announced-the-winners-of-its-first-open-exhibition/ Humberside-based artist Marc Appleton was the winner with his pencil, charcoal and chalk drawing Silent Vessel – Out Newton Among the initial shortlist of six works, the overall winner of the Yorkshire Coast Destination Bid Art Prize is the pencil, charcoal and chalk drawing Silent Vessel – Out Newton by Humberside-based artist Marc Appleton. Marc […]]]>
Humberside-based artist Marc Appleton was the winner with his pencil, charcoal and chalk drawing Silent Vessel - Out Newton
Humberside-based artist Marc Appleton was the winner with his pencil, charcoal and chalk drawing Silent Vessel – Out Newton

Among the initial shortlist of six works, the overall winner of the Yorkshire Coast Destination Bid Art Prize is the pencil, charcoal and chalk drawing Silent Vessel – Out Newton by Humberside-based artist Marc Appleton.

Marc uses drawing and photography to create a contemporary vision of contemplative moments and places of solitude in the landscape.

After hearing the news, Marc said, “The first open art exhibition provided a fantastic opportunity for local artists to show their work in a setting that I found intriguing and challenging, but also complementary to my work.

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The Visitors’ Choice award went to local artist and designer Sue Wood for her cheerful textile work Sunset over the Castle

I was very surprised and grateful to be shortlisted, let alone selected as the winner of the OPO Open Yorkshire Coast Destination Art Prize. It is an honor to have my work featured among all the other great works.

In contrast, the winner of the Visitors’ Choice award goes to Scarborough-based artist and designer Sue Wood for her cheerful textile artwork Sunset over the Castle.

The Hawthorne Print Prize was awarded to Graham Firth for one of his humorous prints.

Sue said: ‘When the Old Parcels Office called for entries for its first open art exhibition I was keen to submit examples of my work as it is such an exciting and contemporary art space.

“I was thrilled that Sunset over the Castle, an artwork created by layering mixed textiles, with free machine embroidery, needle felting and appliqués, naïve in style but evocative of happy nostalgic seaside holidays, has been accepted.

So to be awarded the Visitors’ Choice is incredible. I’m totally overwhelmed, so thank you to everyone who enjoyed seeing the exciting and eclectic artwork in this exhibit but chose to vote for mine.

The Old Parcels Office exhibition attracted over 150 submissions from artists across the UK and attracted over 600 visitors.

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